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Whitestone

F Y I, Garmin 296 Software

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Did you know that Garmin Basecamp also accepts KMZ/KML (Google Earth) files as a supported format. Although Basecamp takes some getting used to (after map source) and it could use some improvements in some areas, it does have some improved features from map source. For one it will allow you to save the file as GDB and upload direct to GPS (without using a 3rd party softwRe like GPS Babel).

I didn't know that BaseCamp supported the KMZ/KML file type. I have tried BaseCamp a few times but never consistently, I kept running into "roadblocks", the filing system for one, so have not learned the in's and out's of it. It was just easier to keep using MapSource but maybe this revelation will get me to take another look and stick with it.

 

Thanks Freewheel.

 

W.

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Whitestone that link you sent is the reason for my query to Foreflight. Looks like a one way check valve - the instructions are for importing waypoints and nowhere could I find instructions to export them.

 

The support response said there was no easy way - has anyone found a workaround?

 

Cheers,

tin lizzie

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I didn't know that BaseCamp supported the KMZ/KML file type. I have tried BaseCamp a few times but never consistently, I kept running into "roadblocks", the filing system for one, so have not learned the in's and out's of it. It was just easier to keep using MapSource but maybe this revelation will get me to take another look and stick with it.

 

Thanks Freewheel.

 

W.

No problem at all. FYI all of the Basecamp installs I have done using a variety of installation disks need an immediate software update (the initial software is full of bugs). Unfortunately, when you click the "check for software updates"link in the software it says no software updates available...that's one of the bugs.

You need to go to Garmin.com support and download the latest update manually then run it.

 

After that it runs great. It does take some getting used to though. There are some excellent tutorial videos. A window usually pops up when you open software with a link to the tutorials

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tin lizzie,

 

Have you tried Navionics for marine charts. Available in Apple Apps Store?

 

 

Comment: I have found this thread to be one of the best on Vertical Forums. Thank you all!

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I "fondly" remember the good ol' days days when pilots didn't find their destination due to difficulty navigating due to low altitude flying in poor weather or running short of fuel, yeah, the good old days...

 

 

I don't get it ...... back in the day before GPS ....... we actually never had any difficulty navigating. We just followed the map to our destination. Bad weather meant you just worked a little harder ....

 

Running short of fuel ...... that definitely had nothing to do with not having GPS .....

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My hands are shaking a bit as I write this!! I AGREE with HelicopterJim!!

 

I don't recall ever being "lost" for more than a few minutes though northern Alberta (Edra area) before roads crisscrossed everywhere could be a challenge with lack of defining features.

 

There is no doubt that GPS makes things easier - sometimes too easy, I think. They have been known to break. It is impossible to argue against them, but I remind everyone that good airmanship would tell you to at least have the relative map available to you in the cockpit. I have seen more than one pilot out there that would have a problem finding a map, much less know which one he/she should be looking for.

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The "old days" of poor to non-existent forecasting combined with unexpected low ceilings and trying to read a VNC chart while on the tree tops after going beyond the point of no return and flying on a compass heading and your watch, made for some tense moments. Upon reaching the appointed time/distance, then flying in ever increasing circles till you found the camp or fuel cache, that's a documented fact. I also consider myself fortunate to have been able to talk at length with a few retired bush flyers and they have shared their experiences with me, kind of like a taking "Vortex" news letter in some cases.

 

There are of course exceptions to every rule, pilots who are lucky enough or really amazing, never to have had something like that happen to them. I am still looking forward to meeting that old timer and talking to him, but it would probably have to be outdoors though because i don't think their head would fit through the door... ha ha ha, roll-eyes !

 

I am not saying that GPS is only the answer, but it's another arrow in your quiver so to speak, to use to help you get to your destination safely and on time. Navigation has been an evolution, starting with someone walking using landmarks then somewhere along the way the compass was invented and on and on it went to the present day. Not to far into the future we will either be completely paperless or back to waking from tree to tree.

 

Happy flying,

 

W.

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You are obviously right Whitestone about everything that you say.

One might argue that GPS has us flying on days that maybe we shouldn't be flying. Whether it be smoke or fog, many are pretty casual in the conditions we fly in because we know we will not get lost. And that includes pressure from the customer......."well, you have GPS......."

 

I didn't mean to get off topic here - you go back to your techie talk that I have no clue about - sorry.

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[quote name="Maury" post=

One might argue that GPS has us flying on days that maybe we shouldn't be flying. Whether it be smoke or fog, many are pretty casual in the conditions we fly in because we know we will not get lost. And that includes pressure from the customer......."well, you have GPS......." .

 

So.....when one has decided to undertake a flight as described, and your GPS has failed, because you are low in the mountains and your signal is lost.....???!?!?!

 

As I spend most (all) of my time in a two pilot cockpit......it is very apparent navigation skills have all but disappeared with the newer pilots.....chart reading (whether paper or electronic) is a dying trend it seems.

It is imperative to have solid navigation skills when a pilot gets into new territory, and critical when flying in a new country.

GPS should be considered a secondary means of navigation....not a primary!!!!?!?!

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