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yeah well there's a few more still out there I suspect..........amongst this forum for one I may add

 

Oh Yeah? You think there's a lot of commercial pilots flying around completely smashed and crashing their helicopters? Do you have proof or are you just talking ####? Let's act like professionals here.

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Plenty of proof .

 

Almost Every pilot i knew in my career was suffering at one point of heavy alcoolisim , going out very hung over ....

But still flying cool tho !

 

Cmon ! most us here knows !

 

This particular incident can be a suicide to , who knows really !

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Gentlemen and ladies,

 

This post is beginning to turn ugly with some dangerous finger pointing that could lead to something regrettable. Rumours and innuendo can cause much damage.

 

Was the tragedy shocking? Yes it was. Was it preventable? Possibly, if someone had gotten involved at the right time? When was the right time? Weeks ago? Months ago? Years ago? No one will know.

 

In this small industry there is regrettably an unwritten code amongst pilots, perhaps among AMEs as well. Certainly amongst the old-timers. How many times have any of us witnessed a pilot (or even an engineer) who was under the influence (including hangovers) but nothing was done? Why? We want to be seen as a good guy. Maybe we were too new in the industry and were afraid of making waves. Maybe we were too new in the company and didn't know the players and were afraid of losing our job. Maybe at some point in our younger days we pushed the boundaries as well and felt hypocritical saying anything now. Maybe the guy was some folklore God and we dare not say anything.

 

This is indeed a sad, sad event. But thankfully the loss wasn't greater than it was (other crew/passengers). Perhaps the next time this happens, it will involve greater loss of life and will impact so many more people. There will be a next time, mark my words, because unfortunately we're only human and mistakes are repeated. But it is incumbent upon us to strive to ensure that the next time isn't on our watch - while we're with the same company, while we're at the same Fire Base, while we're listening to the stories of what's his name and what he did last night.

 

All it takes is guts and balls to do the right thing. And we all know when that time is because we've all been there, been in the situation where - Christ! I should've said something! Oh thank God nothing happened - boy do I feel better! Phew! I hope I don't ever have to go through that again.

 

As the saying goes, hindsight is 20/20....It's not just drinking. It's the cowboy pilot, the pilot that takes unnecessary risks, the engineer who shortcuts, the guy whose in over his head. The Rap Attack guy that slides down the rope who takes the "odd" toke to take the edge off.

 

Pontificating is not one of my strong points, but I would be remiss in not saying that I too was one of those guys that didn't say something when something should have been said - would've could've should've...

 

Let the professional investigators determine cause. In the meantime, lets look after each other and the people who fly in the back of our machines.

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Gentlemen and ladies,

 

This post is beginning to turn ugly with some dangerous finger pointing that could lead to something regrettable. Rumours and innuendo can cause much damage.

 

Was the tragedy shocking? Yes it was. Was it preventable? Possibly, if someone had gotten involved at the right time? When was the right time? Weeks ago? Months ago? Years ago? No one will know.

 

In this small industry there is regrettably an unwritten code amongst pilots, perhaps among AMEs as well. Certainly amongst the old-timers. How many times have any of us witnessed a pilot (or even an engineer) who was under the influence (including hangovers) but nothing was done? Why? We want to be seen as a good guy. Maybe we were too new in the industry and were afraid of making waves. Maybe we were too new in the company and didn't know the players and were afraid of losing our job. Maybe at some point in our younger days we pushed the boundaries as well and felt hypocritical saying anything now. Maybe the guy was some folklore God and we dare not say anything.

 

This is indeed a sad, sad event. But thankfully the loss wasn't greater than it was (other crew/passengers). Perhaps the next time this happens, it will involve greater loss of life and will impact so many more people. There will be a next time, mark my words, because unfortunately we're only human and mistakes are repeated. But it is incumbent upon us to strive to ensure that the next time isn't on our watch - while we're with the same company, while we're at the same Fire Base, while we're listening to the stories of what's his name and what he did last night.

 

All it takes is guts and balls to do the right thing. And we all know when that time is because we've all been there, been in the situation where - Christ! I should've said something! Oh thank God nothing happened - boy do I feel better! Phew! I hope I don't ever have to go through that again.

 

As the saying goes, hindsight is 20/20....It's not just drinking. It's the cowboy pilot, the pilot that takes unnecessary risks, the engineer who shortcuts, the guy whose in over his head. The Rap Attack guy that slides down the rope who takes the "odd" toke to take the edge off.

 

Pontificating is not one of my strong points, but I would be remiss in not saying that I too was one of those guys that didn't say something when something should have been said - would've could've should've...

 

Let the professional investigators determine cause. In the meantime, lets look after each other and the people who fly in the back of our machines.

 

As a retired old-timer I agree.

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An AME friend of mine along the pilot and a passenger lost their lives due to alcohol accident in 1973.

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Anybody who doesn't learn from their mistakes or the mistakes of others will end up repeating them.

 

It is 2014 now, the world and our industry has changed, there are plenty of non alcoholic people out there who will be happy to take your job.

 

I've sent line employees home for being hungover and would not think twice about ratting anyone out for performing critical tasks whilst under the influence of anything including mental instability.

 

I'm sorry we can't make it 100% but we can sure as **** try regardless of our age or number of days in this or any other industry.

 

RAISE THE BAR!

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Oh Yeah? You think there's a lot of commercial pilots flying around completely smashed and crashing their helicopters? Do you have proof or are you just talking ####? Let's act like professionals here.

Edited by warner

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Oh Yeah? You think there's a lot of commercial pilots flying around completely smashed and crashing their helicopters? Do you have proof or are you just talking ####? Let's act like professionals here.

Edited by warner

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