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Phil Croucher

Faa/tc Licensing Agreement

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A couple of years ago I was looking into this and was told by the FAA that it may not happen for helicopters as it did for fixed wing. The number of helicopter pilots vs fixed wing it would benefit was one of the reasons. To few helicopter pilots.

Another reason was because the FAA didn't have the budget to make this happen. Im surprised to hear the rumour that it might be happening now. I went the other route to obtain my FAA ATP hoping to secure employment in the USA but that just led me to the next road block, Immigration. The USA is very protectionist about jobs and other things. There is also a downsizing going on there in the US military right now and they expect about 2000 helo pilots to hit the streets looking for work.

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As stated by mohave green, if your Canadian, and can convert you TC to FAA, don't think that the doors to the US just opened up! Unless it has changes recently, there are no work permits for anything aviation in the US(AME or Pilot) under NAFTA(that comes from my immigration lawyer). Now if you were a dental hygienist....they roll out the red carpet!

For N# flying international, whole other deal I imagine.

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A couple of years ago I was looking into this and was told by the FAA that it may not happen for helicopters as it did for fixed wing. The number of helicopter pilots vs fixed wing it would benefit was one of the reasons. To few helicopter pilots.

Another reason was because the FAA didn't have the budget to make this happen. Im surprised to hear the rumour that it might be happening now. I went the other route to obtain my FAA ATP hoping to secure employment in the USA but that just led me to the next road block, Immigration. The USA is very protectionist about jobs and other things. There is also a downsizing going on there in the US military right now and they expect about 2000 helo pilots to hit the streets looking for work.

. Stay optimistic my friend because i garantee you when this will happen, i land a job flying N within 5 phone calls !

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You guys can be as optimistic as you want....but I suggest you be realistic.

N or C registered doesn't matter.

This deal is all about licensing...not work visas.

 

However, there are jobs available under NAFTA, (get a new lawyer), but they are hard to find.

That won't change.

If you do qualify for a visa you will probably need a FAA licence as in the past. That was possible to get in the past, but a hassle. This will just make that process easier.

 

P.s. My remarks come after 10 years of NAFTA work. Good luck. It's not easy. Your employer will need a good lawyer.

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It's been my experience as of late that the US ATP is a good thing to have. I have both CAN and US ATP's. Working domestically as many posters have written is an immigration matter. The US market is closed to americans for the most part. However going direct into working in the offshore international environment now adays requires and ATP -having the US ATP opens doors…

 

The big problem with the Canadian ATPL is that there is almost no avenue for Canadian Citizens to access the Canadian ATPLH ( paying for it) without having worked for a Canadian company and obtaining a PPC on a Multi crew twin. The ACPs are all locked up by CHC and others. You just simply cannot call flight safety or CAE and ask to speak with a Canadian examiner and book a SIM check or type rating -it is possible but cost prohibitive. There are only a handfull of TRE/TRI's thjat are doing outside work… You could call an operator and ask to pay for a mulit engine endorsement but this is also difficult and cost prohibitive. Most AC are busy on contract and be sure the Helicopter you choose is multicrew IFR on its type certificate.

 

If you have some VFR twin time and the 100 hrs of night, i would highly advise getting a current Commercial IFR and taking your US ATP. It will open doors.

 

To be fair, CHC and others are all being bough out by US monster companies….

 

P5

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Don't see what the big fuss is about. In real terms, little will change. I learn't to fly in Britain way back when. Then I went to fly in the US and then Canada. Niether the Canadian or the US exams scratch the surface compared to the JAA when it comes to subject matter covered. Much of it far too in depth in my opinion.

As it stands right now, if a Canadian pilot was set on getting his FAA ticket he would have little problem with the FAA exam and check ride, while a US guy might find it a little more difficult doing the Canadian.

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When you talk about job protectionism, remember it works both ways. It is just as difficult if not more so for a USA citizen to get a job in Canada as the reverse. I do speak from experience. I have hired non-citizen/non-resident/non-green card holders for 'permantent' jobs in the US with a lot less problems than I encountered when I was hired for a 6 week contract job in Canada.

 

As for the US military drawdown, I don't believe that it will have that much of an effect on the job market. First of all it is stated to be 2000 or so, not the 'Thousands' RIFed after Viet Nam. I was in the job market during that time and based on my experience during that time, I believe that a percentage will drop out of aviation. Another percentage will transfer to the USCG, we are already seeing that. And the USCG aviation branch is changing and looks like it will grow some more. With the 'stop-loss' programs over the last 12 years or so in the US military, many of those will be at a point in their military careers that they can retire in 5 years or so. And some will elect to remain in the military.

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My Canadian licence only allows me to fly a N registered ship in Canada.....I must have my FAA for the crane work I do in Istanbul or any other country. Even if the FAA does change the ruling....I doubt the insurance underwriters will follow suit, at least not right away.

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