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Best helicopter school in Canada right now ?

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16 hours ago, snowedin said:

If you can find a school that does that yes for sure you should go there, but as we found out recently no schools do this, see airtime flight time thread and HAC newsletter. At some point this may happen but the rates charged by the school will reflect that. Experience of instructors is huge, aircraft used for training, and ask if you will do any full on autos....it seems less and less do them, which is frightening for the industry as a whole. What "extra" training will you get inside the 100 hours. By extra I mean something other than the flight test minimums. Will you sling/longline or is that beyond the 100 hour course?

 

Full on autos - can you please explain it more for a newbie ?

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Are the the prices quoted by schools final or you can negotiate ?

Reason is even when using same helicopter (R22) different prices are quoted by different schools ?

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So for your first question the big debate in our industry now relates to flight time, which the aircraft running til the aircraft stops....this is usually how customers get billed in our business. The blades are turning, fuel is being consumed, a pilot has to be at the controls...but the maintenance only pertains to air time....the time the aircraft is airborne. Right now you need 100 hours of flight time, and your rate reflects that the operator may only do 85-90 hours in the air during your training. If the rules change and you need 100 hours of air time you can expect the rates to go up correspondingly....15% ish

In your training you are expected to master the art of auto-rotations....the simulated engine failure. The procedure should be carried out to the ground, with the engine at idle...maybe not all the time but you need to be trained on how this feels. It is supposed to be a flight test item....but many schools are not doing them, and as a result there are graduated pilots out in the industry who have never completed any autorotations to the ground. I recently did some training with an instructor who had never done one...which is truly frightening. You need to ask your school if you will do them, and hold them to their answer. If they talk around it, you need to run away fast

Prices will vary from school to school but in my experience the schools are giving you a competitive rate. I would be surprised if they would negotiate. It can be problematic with students when one student is paying x and another y.....not good from a pr perspective.

Prices will also vary depending on type of aircraft...your choices are primarily the 22, the 44 or the Cabri, which seems to be making inroads in the Canadian market and by all accouonts is a terrific trainer

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On 10/11/2018 at 6:08 AM, snowedin said:

If you can find a school that does that yes for sure you should go there, but as we found out recently no schools do this, see airtime flight time thread and HAC newsletter. At some point this may happen but the rates charged by the school will reflect that. Experience of instructors is huge, aircraft used for training, and ask if you will do any full on autos....it seems less and less do them, which is frightening for the industry as a whole. What "extra" training will you get inside the 100 hours. By extra I mean something other than the flight test minimums. Will you sling/longline or is that beyond the 100 hour course?

 

Coast Helicopter College used to charge air time. Not sure if they still do or not as it's under different ownership now but worth checking out. 

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On 10/12/2018 at 10:55 AM, snowedin said:

So for your first question the big debate in our industry now relates to flight time, which the aircraft running til the aircraft stops....this is usually how customers get billed in our business. The blades are turning, fuel is being consumed, a pilot has to be at the controls...but the maintenance only pertains to air time....the time the aircraft is airborne. Right now you need 100 hours of flight time, and your rate reflects that the operator may only do 85-90 hours in the air during your training. If the rules change and you need 100 hours of air time you can expect the rates to go up correspondingly....15% ish

In your training you are expected to master the art of auto-rotations....the simulated engine failure. The procedure should be carried out to the ground, with the engine at idle...maybe not all the time but you need to be trained on how this feels. It is supposed to be a flight test item....but many schools are not doing them, and as a result there are graduated pilots out in the industry who have never completed any autorotations to the ground. I recently did some training with an instructor who had never done one...which is truly frightening. You need to ask your school if you will do them, and hold them to their answer. If they talk around it, you need to run away fast

Prices will vary from school to school but in my experience the schools are giving you a competitive rate. I would be surprised if they would negotiate. It can be problematic with students when one student is paying x and another y.....not good from a pr perspective.

Prices will also vary depending on type of aircraft...your choices are primarily the 22, the 44 or the Cabri, which seems to be making inroads in the Canadian market and by all accouonts is a terrific trainer

Thanks a lot for the detailed and precise answers.

the Cabri, which seems to be making inroads in the Canadian market and by all accouonts is a terrific trainer  - By that you mean in a good way or bay way ?

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On 10/12/2018 at 9:26 PM, Heizenberg said:

Coast Helicopter College used to charge air time. Not sure if they still do or not as it's under different ownership now but worth checking out. 

Yes, Bob used to charge skids up to skids down. Who owns it now?

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in a great way....by all accounts it is everything the 22 is lacking....roomy, autos fantastically, digital display. same engine, same fuel burn...should be close to the same price making it a great initial training helicopter

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On 10/15/2018 at 6:27 AM, xrkyle said:

Yes, Bob used to charge skids up to skids down. Who owns it now?

Albert, one of his instructors while he was still there. 

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