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Comments on BC Helicopters as flight school

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11 hours ago, Blackmac said:

Having been around for a little while, the original fuel for most helicopters and fixed wing turbine aircraft was Jet-B. It came about that that fuel was to explosive and it was abolished.

So,along came Jet-A1 fuel. That fuel was fine in temperatures above freezing, below freezing you would have to add a liquid to increase the flow and prevent freezing in the fuel line and governor. The original Jet-B was a mixture of Kerosene and Naphtha.

Complaints were made to the fuel companies and engine manufacturer to come up with a solution to operate there AC in temperatures down to 30 below F.

The engine manufacturer agreed to a mixture  of  2/3 Jet-A to 1/3 Av gas would not harm the turbines.

The only turbine engine I know of that could burn Jet-A1 and or Diesel  fuel in the winter was made by Pratt and Whitney.

SO THAT IS THE STORY OF PUTTING AVGAS IN A TURBINE ENGINE.

Cheers, Don

 

 

 

Jet B was common because all of the northern work in cold weather.  It is essentially a mix 70/30 hence the "wide cut" labeling.

Jet A was pushed out in favour of Jet A-1 Which has a freezing point of -47degC over Jet A's -40degC. Jet A-1 has antistatic additives to make it safer.

MOST manufacturers will recommend running Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII) to improve cold weather performance.  

Each engine type has approved fuels listed and limits associated with them.  RRC20 is 5 hrs of avgas before overhaul.(emerg only), some pt6 models can run diesel all day if it's warm enough. 

Always check your engine manuals for proper fuel usage and types.

 

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I could be wrong, but I thought Jet B was removed for the reason I stated and only Jet A was available for the smaller turbines in the winter months, worked fine in the summer months. In the area I was operating, not being a coneseure of fuel additives I checked with Standard Aero in WPG as to what I could do to get alight off at cold temperatures and they came up with the mixture I stated. Most areas in the north in the winter time the only place to get fuel in the bush is OMNR (Jet A).

Using only AVGAS in a turbine is a no,no and only under extreme circumstances.(War)

 A pilot is lucky if he gets to fly the same helicopter all the time and I always wonder how the pilot I am replacing handled the machine without recording any overtemps or overtorque to the ame, happens. 

Your response is much appreciated and well informed, I only hope people listen.

TKS, Don

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On 5/10/2020 at 9:34 AM, Heliian said:

 

Jet B was common because all of the northern work in cold weather.  It is essentially a mix 70/30 hence the "wide cut" labeling.

Jet A was pushed out in favour of Jet A-1 Which has a freezing point of -47degC over Jet A's -40degC. Jet A-1 has antistatic additives to make it safer.

MOST manufacturers will recommend running Fuel System Icing Inhibitor (FSII) to improve cold weather performance.  

Each engine type has approved fuels listed and limits associated with them.  RRC20 is 5 hrs of avgas before overhaul.(emerg only), some pt6 models can run diesel all day if it's warm enough. 

Always check your engine manuals for proper fuel usage and types.

 

As far as I know DEW Line sites only have winter diesel for both the generators and the helicopter fuel. 212's and 61's have been burning that for years up there.

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