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55 minutes ago, Winnie said:

Funny thing though, almost all fixed wing instructors are just timebuilding. 

 

I strongly disagree, I think the instructors should have the basics down, so that the student can d=fly an accurate circuit, can fly a cross country, can talk on the radio, then the industry should teach them how to operate. 100 hours is already 50 hours less than the rest of the world, and not nearly enough for basics. I see it time and again.

And where did you get your licence?

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I agree with Rotor, however ask the guy instructing you what it’s like to be on a campaign fire, or in a camp setting, or sitting on a pipeline for 10 hours and you didn’t bring your lunch cuz the cli

I like the part about asking family or friends to lend you the money. If you go that route you are well on your way to realising what life as a pilot will be like.

I would take the fixed wing route these days if were in your shoes. HUGE demand for pilot, great pay, set schedules with the major airlines, etc..

8 hours ago, Full On said:

 

And where did you get your licence?

Does it matter? I got mine in the US, have FAA, TC and EASA licenses.

I worked for 12 years as a class 1 instructor in Canada and also as a company training pilot. and have since worked in industry and see daily the result of lack of basic knowledge, and lack of basic understanding of navigation and simple stuff like planning and flying a circuit. but like I said ,we wont agree on this.

But look again at the airplane side, the majority of instructors are low timers, teaching basics.

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Again you miss the point. you have 100 hours to learn the basics, but when you thin those 100 hours with all sorts of operational stuff you won't be doing for the first 5 years, is useless that could be used elsewhere. Like I said, we will never agree.

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22 hours ago, Winnie said:

Does it matter? I got mine in the US, have FAA, TC and EASA licenses.

I worked for 12 years as a class 1 instructor in Canada and also as a company training pilot. and have since worked in industry and see daily the result of lack of basic knowledge, and lack of basic understanding of navigation and simple stuff like planning and flying a circuit. but like I said ,we wont agree on this.

But look again at the airplane side, the majority of instructors are low timers, teaching basics.

Oops that question was for SpoolDown….that puppy mill comment always drives me nuts. 

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No worries. 

when push comes to shove, it's all the same, everyone has to meet the exact same minimum (barest of minimums really) standard. where they look at a snapshot of your training. the much maligned FAA system has much harder rides, with a much stricter demand for knowledge and a requirement to pass each and every manoeuvre to a graded standard. including each and every ride subsequently. meaning a 135 ride (similar to our PPC for 703) is a complete to commercial (or ATP) standard ride with EVERY aspect checked. the rides last several hours. I know everyone like to disparage our southern brothers, but their system does a better job of checking and training to a standard, than do we here in Canada. But we all meet the same standard.

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  • 3 months later...
On 3/24/2019 at 10:14 AM, pilot83 said:

I agree with Rotor, however ask the guy instructing you what it’s like to be on a campaign fire, or in a camp setting, or sitting on a pipeline for 10 hours and you didn’t bring your lunch cuz the client told you he’d only need an hour, two max and now your thinking about eating the rations from the survival kit cuz you’ve been there all day.  If he’s never been in one of those situations I would look elsewhere.  Anybody can teach you how to fly, but it’s the insights and experience I took away most from my initial training. 

Also go fixed wing!

Hello Gays, I recommend an EASA PART 66 approved website to follow aeronautics courses online and for free.

https://easapart66.academy/part-66-module-8-sample

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