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Bell 206b


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Hey Nick,

 

Not exactly sure what your question is but I'll try and answer it. I'm not current on the BH06 and I've never been a check or training pilot on type but here is my guess.

 

The height velocity diagram defines the conditions from which a safe landing can be made on a smooth, level, firm surface following an engine failure. It is only valid if you are with in the limits of Altitude Versus Gross Weight Limit Diagram which is in Section 4.

 

An example would be if you are at 4,000' DA, 3,100 lbs, 100' AGL, 55MPH IAS you might not get as safe a landing from the aircraft as you would at say 1,000' DA, 3,100 lbs, 100' AGL, 55MPH IAS.

 

Section 4 is the Performance section. You are not required to comply with what is found in the performance section as you would the Limitations section. The performance section is more like what you can expect with the conditions described.

 

Hope this helps and I hope I got it kinda right. I'm sure others will correct me where need be.

 

Later,

ttf

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The VNE mentioned above is only for the power setting between 85-100% - the airspeed choices for the "real" VNE were originally based on speed against blade life - the marketing people chose 130 knots and 5000 hours. The other speed choices were 120 and 140.

 

treetopflyer - you got it about right! One thing worth mentioning, and what I always tell my students is, while it's not in the limitations section, you would still be well advised to follow it as the average jury won't understand the subtle difference.

 

Phil

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Albert Ross ----- undoubtedly blade life was a factor, but retreating blade stall was also another........and in the "F/W world" they call that a "high-speed stall". I've had both demonstrated to me and they "ain't nice" either and are also unforgettable. In the 206, the nose gradually tries to climb....... you push forward more on the cyclic to maintain level flight.......she continues to climb.....you push farther forward. You finally reach a point where you are against the "soft spot", just before max forward on the cyclic and then something happens to get your IMMEDIATE attention.........the fuselage panels begin to "oil-can". At that point the nose comes up, she is now clibing completely vertical and "breaking" sharply to the right, similar to a "hammerhead". The minute...... in reality it wouldn't take that long :shock: .....that you reduce collective, all begins to return to normal. Airspeed before that will be approximately 150MPH and your retreating blade will be fully "stalled-out" for it's complete length. So when they say "Max A/S - 150MPH.........they ain't foolin'.

 

 

...........and YOU stay out of trouble too :D .

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Of course, you're quite right, but I was trying to make the point that marketing have an influence too - the original design was not pretty, so they had some consultants pretty it up.

 

I'm still down and dirty in the powerlines - what are you up to?

 

Phil

 

Albert Ross ----- undoubtedly blade life was a factor, but retreating blade stall was also another........and in the "F/W world" they call that a "high-speed stall". I've had both demonstrated to me and they "ain't nice" either and are also unforgettable. In the 206, the nose gradually tries to climb....... you push forward more on the cyclic to maintain level flight.......she continues to climb.....you push farther forward. You finally reach a point where you are against the "soft spot", just before max forward on the cyclic and then something happens to get your IMMEDIATE attention.........the fuselage panels begin to "oil-can". At that point the nose comes up, she is now clibing completely vertical and "breaking" sharply to the right, similar to a "hammerhead". The minute...... in reality it wouldn't take that long :shock: .....that you reduce collective, all begins to return to normal. Airspeed before that will be approximately 150MPH and your retreating blade will be fully "stalled-out" for it's complete length. So when they say "Max A/S - 150MPH.........they ain't foolin'.

...........and YOU stay out of trouble too :D .

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Very good :up:

 

So, my questions for this morning :

 

I read that without fuel pump the engine will operate under 6000 ft. Does it means there's no mecanic pump or just that you'll have airlock problem above 6000 ft with both pump out ?

 

Where can I find the differents versions of the 206 (engine, panels...)

 

Still looking for fuel and hydro diagrams, and a product data book.

 

Have a nice day

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yep, I'm agree for the endorsement but my loooooooong experience as a job seeker tells me that a nice endorsement doesn't give you a job...too bad...so I save money for another road trip and to be able to be on the move in 10 sec. During this time I'm reading FM : keeps me happy without Prozac :rolleyes:

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Nick ------in short "yes", the engine will function and perform below 6000' without boost pumps. At one time eons ago, boost pumps were part of Bell 47's and other piston -powered a/c that operated ABOVE 6000' and those that didn't had no such "animal" onboard. When one saw a boost pump onboard one of those a/c, one automatically knew that that a/c operated or resided at one time in an operating area much higher than the rest of Canada. There comes with boost pumps an added insurance though and that is if the engine-driven fuel pump should cease to function, THEN they will take over the job of making sure fuel is provided to the engine and there doesn't ensue what is known as "the eerie silence". I have flown lots of hours in a/c that had no boost pump(s) as have others of years gone by.

 

Albert Ross -------you stated "marketing have an influence too"..........surely you must be jesting? When did all that start anyways? :D Wasn't trying to contradict 'ol bean......just supplement you. I'm also attempting to stay alive and out of trouble as you had better be around those Scottish wires. :D

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