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R-22 Training Crash


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Morning folks.

 

I was going to post yesterday but was a little busy and all. I'm the student mentioned.

 

We were both able to walk away so, yes I guess this counts as a good landing.

 

Here's what happened. After a short flight we were practicing hovering. After a few minutes of this the instructor was demonstrating/teaching loss of power in the hover. We had done this the day before as well. I gave too much left cyclic and the instructor was unable to correct me with enough force / in time.  In the literal blink of an eye we were on our left side. The instructor took the brunt of the impact sitting in the left seat. We crawled out the right door, turned off the ELT and walked the couple hundred feet back to the hanger to start making phone calls.

 

I can't say enough about my instructors demeanor. Calm throughout. Amazing.

 

Here's my question to the community.

 

It's hard enough for a new guy to get a job in this business. Would anyone hire a guy with a dynamic rollover to his credit on hour 6 of training? Or should I seriously think about cutting my losses? Both myself and my instructor are willing to keep going with my training. ( have to get back on the horse right? )

 

I appreciate any input

 

Rotorhead Wannabe aka D.R. Crash

 

I am impressed. Your forth right explanation of the event is commendable. Character is far more important an indication of someones future in this business and you have shown a hi level of integrity with this post.

 

When you fly with an instructor at this stage of your training he is responable for all. I know you rinstructor very well and I know he would agree with this. It was his fubar not yours. Don't let this mishap turn you off the biz. Back in the saddle.

 

Finally. The old saying. There are 2 kinds of pilots. Those who have had an accident and those who are going to have one. You lucky guy. You got yours out of the way in the first week. No one was hurt and you had an excellent demonstration of how quickly things can go to worms in a helicopter.

 

Fly on dude!!! :up: :up: :up:

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[Here's my question to the community.

 

. Would anyone hire a guy with a dynamic rollover to his credit on hour 6 of training? Or should I seriously think about cutting my losses? I appreciate any

input

 

Hey never let one or two wrecks get in the way of a rewarding career...

Even the CP of one of the biggest operators lay an multi eng. heavy on its side in a training mishap!

Wrap it up...send it Frank...It'll be good as new!

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uhh, I just noticed something which begs a question. Was there a fundamental misunderstanding re. the procedure? RW, please take this in the spirit of further understanding (mostly mine), NOT critisism.

 

You said, "I gave too much left cyclic and the instructor was unable to correct me with enough force / in time." In the R22, Engine Failure at the Hover would require application of a slight amount of RIGHT cyclic to counter loss of tail rotor thrust, not left. Was the instructor ready to counter too much right cyclic, but not too much left cyclic?

 

Exercise 11 - Engine Failure at the Hover/Hover Taxi

 

Rotorcraft Flying Handbook - WARNING - 10.5 MBs. see page 11-4, page 101 of the PDF

 

Hovering Autorotation - includes link to pictures

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RW,

 

From one who has been in the hiring seat - as a prospective new entrant into the industry your character & attitude is by far more important then the flight skills you'll bring with you to any interview.

 

If your recent posts give any indication of who you are, I'd say you're passing a personal power check by a safe margin...

 

If you want it you'll never get it by quitting.

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<_< Hmmm....First, as always, it is great to hear no one was hurt. It is all so easy for some out there to be armchair instructors and pick apart the mishap from a computer. :down: The fact is.....it was just an error, a mistake, or whatever you want to call it. And as we are "all" mere mortals (human), we "all" make mistakes, the true test of our character, is how we deal with it after the fact... ;)
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...It is all so easy for some out there to be armchair instructors and pick apart the mishap from a computer. :down:   The fact is.....it was just an error, a mistake, or whatever you want to call it. And as we are "all" mere mortals (human), we "all" make mistakes, the true test of our character, is how we deal with it after the fact... ;)

Despite my effort it seems I obviously failed, at least in Helilog's eyes, to put my question in the correct context. :( I just want to learn from another's mishap, so I don't have to repeat the lesson. NOT to be an armchair instructor, to be a better real world instructor.

 

As you will note in my earlier post I addressed RW's commendable character and willingness to share his story. If my question seems out of place, poorly timed, or is otherwise misinterpreted, I apologize.

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Not at all Justfly......Perhaps it would have been better for me to point out that the student, having undergone a fairly traumatic experience, would have difficulty analyzing the experience that would have happened in a split second (or two). Even for experienced pilots that have had an accident, it can be difficult to give an accurate account of what actually ocurred.

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