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State of the industry for low-timers


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Nice to see the forum alive again.

Wondering what the state of the industry is like for low-timers right now.

We all know there's a shortage of experienced guys, but after having a chat to a few young guys looking to get into the job, I realised I don't really know what it's like right now for those trying to get that first job.

Hoping to hear from people that are involved in the hiring process, or have recently gone through it themselves.

 

Cheers all.

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1 hour ago, Tee4 said:

We all know there's a shortage of experienced guys

That is the biggest lie in Canada’s industry!  It needs to stop, I’m tired of seeing young guys having the wrong idea (largely cultivated by colleges and flight schools)  going into this racket in Canada and having their hopes and dreams dashed.

Make no mistake, there  are scores of very talented/experienced guys (pilots and ame’s alike).  What there is a shortage of is experienced guys willing to work for 🐕 💩 wages and even worse schedules and lifestyles.

 As for starting out it’s no different in Canada than it’s ever been, find an operator, kiss 🫏 , sweep floors, scrub toilets, shop “go-for”, flight follow, owners personal beeotch, work 16-24 hours a day for a “day rate” seven days a week.  

This can last for anywhere from six months to three years before you start actually flying, depending on how much you get along and they like you.
 Even better they may hint at or suggest you pay for your own first type rating to “get an edge” against other low timers.  Never pay for your own ratings unless you own a company!.  If you survive this abuse and get past 1000-1500 hours you’ll start making a livable wage.  It’ll be years on the road away from home feeding flys and in extreme weather conditions before you’re worthy of a 4-2 or 3-3/2-2 schedule.  By then the schedule and lack of pay will have taken a toll on your personal life, bank balance and credit score.

Never sign training bonds unless you consult a lawyer first.  
Check the registry, the last I did there was around 1000-1500 commercially registered helicopters in Canada (about 2-2500 total).  That should tell you about how big this “industry” is.  The good thing for you is less and less people are indeed getting into it (domestically) because of the aforementioned conditions and shrinking job opportunities and industry in general in Canada.  
Lots of large companies packed it in the last five years and many machines have been deported or parted out.  Not only are there less domestic pilots being trained in Canada more and more foreign pilots come here and work ridiculous schedules for even worse pay to further put the competition screws to you.

My Advice:  IF you really want to make a go of this industry be prepared to take what I’ve described and worse.
Get your experience and once you’re worth something (or maybe during the abuse) consider getting your FAA license and look states side for better opportunities/variety.  Barring any oil and gas or exploration boom in Canada things are very hazy for the future in the vtol world in.  
I hope this will clarify a few things for a greenhorn and you see this post before the forums disappear into the ether.

Best of luck!

CM119

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2 hours ago, CM119 said:

That is the biggest lie in Canada’s industry!  It needs to stop, I’m tired of seeing young guys having the wrong idea (largely cultivated by colleges and flight schools)  going into this racket in Canada and having their hopes and dreams dashed.

Make no mistake, there  are scores of very talented/experienced guys (pilots and ame’s alike).  What there is a shortage of is experienced guys willing to work for 🐕 💩 wages and even worse schedules and lifestyles.

 As for starting out it’s no different in Canada than it’s ever been, find an operator, kiss 🫏 , sweep floors, scrub toilets, shop “go-for”, flight follow, owners personal beeotch, work 16-24 hours a day for a “day rate” seven days a week.  

This can last for anywhere from six months to three years before you start actually flying, depending on how much you get along and they like you.
 Even better they may hint at or suggest you pay for your own first type rating to “get an edge” against other low timers.  Never pay for your own ratings unless you own a company!.  If you survive this abuse and get past 1000-1500 hours you’ll start making a livable wage.  It’ll be years on the road away from home feeding flys and in extreme weather conditions before you’re worthy of a 4-2 or 3-3/2-2 schedule.  By then the schedule and lack of pay will have taken a toll on your personal life, bank balance and credit score.

Never sign training bonds unless you consult a lawyer first.  
Check the registry, the last I did there was around 1000-1500 commercially registered helicopters in Canada (about 2-2500 total).  That should tell you about how big this “industry” is.  The good thing for you is less and less people are indeed getting into it (domestically) because of the aforementioned conditions and shrinking job opportunities and industry in general in Canada.  
Lots of large companies packed it in the last five years and many machines have been deported or parted out.  Not only are there less domestic pilots being trained in Canada more and more foreign pilots come here and work ridiculous schedules for even worse pay to further put the competition screws to you.

My Advice:  IF you really want to make a go of this industry be prepared to take what I’ve described and worse.
Get your experience and once you’re worth something (or maybe during the abuse) consider getting your FAA license and look states side for better opportunities/variety.  Barring any oil and gas or exploration boom in Canada things are very hazy for the future in the vtol world in.  
I hope this will clarify a few things for a greenhorn and you see this post before the forums disappear into the ether.

Best of luck!

CM119

Well said CM119

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I disagree 

we have 500-1000 hour pool pilots on a solid 2/2 most given AS350 and mountain course on hire

kids are getting well looked after these days. yes you need to get to that 500 hour mark which involves learning the industry its not for some but hard work pays off heck id have half my life back if i was on a 2/2.

its great to see companies and even the old school ones now doing a 2/2 hard to ever go back 

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11 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

heck id have half my life back if i was on a 2/2.

That’s what it was many moons ago.  It’s pathetic that industry turned everyone on eachother to exploit hours and days out of eachother for the sake of saving crew a change.  If you’ve been around long enough you know EXACTLY what im talking about.  As for the pay….. LOL

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4 minutes ago, Pinnacle said:

Canadian 

baileys 

yellowhead 

delta 

mustang 

they are to name a few hiring low time and giving them a real go and now a schedule 

lol ya I know all of those companies and what they pay… thanks

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