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Aerobatics


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Straight from the CAR's (101.01):

 

"aerobatic manoeuvre" - means a manoeuvre where a change in the attitude of an aircraft results in a bank angle greater than 60 degrees, an abnormal attitude or an abnormal acceleration not incidental to normal flying.

Sad isn't it.  Being so 'limited'.

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Why not?

 

I can''t think of any situation that requires more than 60º of bank and 30º nose up, when done correctly - not even towing bird on 50m spacings, of which I have done my fair share.

 

Of course, you can also hammerhead the thing around and turn it inside out if you want to, but that brings to mind the ''old bull / young bull'' story

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Guest sharky

----------------

On 6/10/2003 8:40:55 PM Bruised Armpit wrote:

 

 

Straight from the CAR''s (101.01):

 

"aerobatic manoeuvre" - means a manoeuvre where a change in the attitude of an aircraft results in a bank angle greater than 60 degrees, an abnormal attitude or an abnormal acceleration not incidental to normal flying.

Sad isn''t it.  Being so ''limited''.

 

----------------

"....normal flying.." Would spray turns fall under normal flying if you were spraying?

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Well, I have 3 interesting points...take them for what there worth!

 

1) any aircraft i have ever flown states in the first page of the limitations section that any or all aerobatic maneuvers are strictly prohibited. Therefore there are no "certified" aerobatic rotorcraft class aircraft out there that you or i will ever see!

 

2) have never seen a helicopter aerobatic training school or instructor advertised out there either!!! yet there are lots for welded wing aircraft...hmmmm

 

3) with reference to the first two, I must conclude that all "stunt" pilots are then "self taught" in "limited" aircraft. which are old, have been over torqued, temped and overspeed not to mention rebuilt at some point in there "life". aluminium never forgets!!!

 

our old canadian fleet of aircraft work hard enough as it is with out the extra added abuse. ask your engineer or your chief pilot what he thinks of "aerobatics" you will be amazed at their "definition".

 

do us all a big favour. if you ever see anyone doing any of this crap. when he lands, punch him in the mouth and do what ever yu can to get his *** fired. and make sure you tell your boss who he is so he does not hire him. the smallness of this industry is a beautiful thing sometimes.

 

...chances are one of your good friends, who plays by the rules, will be the next one to fly that bird...not a nice thought...there is a lot to be said for the professional pilot who flys straight and level!

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I remember seeing (on TV) a team of pilots with R22''s doing some type of team aerobatics, or at least formation demonstrations many years ago.

 

As for the spraying, yeah, you can go just as fast doing ''flat'' turns, (ask H.B. sharky), but that is just boring!

ps...I am happy to be out of that racket. Never knew what the last guy did with the ship!

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Some of that goop causes a lot of premature engine corrosion too. I have seen it first hand. Allison sent something out about it several years ago...just after the 'geers took apart the engine I was using and showed me the corroded and cracked wheels.

It did give me warnings...that is why they cracked it open.

 

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Bruised,

The team you are talking about is probably showcopters, out of somewhere in calif. or nevada.

The pilots all had several thousand hours each, and were supposed to be some of the most experienced in R22/44. However, one of them took a feller up for an intro flight close to Monterrey, Calif in the summer of 2000, and they managed to get a case of shedding the main rotor after cutting of necesary parts of the airframe, and unfortunately neither survived.

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