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hurler

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You will be happy to know That I too was Janitor for the first year until the CP felt that I could handle the broom, then guess what? I got to drive the company truck!

 

The following year the company decided that I was worthy to fly away in one of thier million dollar helicopters, and when that chance came I did everything in my power to keep thier trust and not fu%k it up. I made alot of mistakes as most freshly minted pilots do, not big trash equipment mistakes but little things because I really only had the experience form watching some of the older guys. Some of these guys had good advice some bad, but I learned to weed through the BS and increased my knowledge at the same time. Until I hit a 1000 hours and it took 4 years of putting up with crap, my life started to get easier and jobs became more avialable.

 

Don't be discouraged, as hard as it may be , if you can gain the trust ,demonstrate attention to detail, maturity ,safety and persistance your time will come.

 

Good luck

 

Hurler

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Vol

 

Think of it this way, When a doctor graduates form medical school they don't let him perform brain surgery. A paralel professional comparison happens in the rotarty wing industry too.

 

I'm sure you'll do fine.

 

 

Cheers

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Being a rampie isn't all bad. It's the first job I ever had that I actually liked. Plus most places will let ya get some stick time every now and then if they figure you deserve it. Might just be as a co-pilot on a ferry flight, or as PIC if you're lucky and you earned it.

 

Take me for example. On the ramp for 6 months now and got to sit right seat in a S61 for a ferry flight. All the blood, sweat and tears of being a rampie are well worth a pay-off like that!

 

(And as a rampie you will bleed, sweat and cry) :lol:

 

Like the others say, don't fret. Almost every pilot on this forum started out as a mop jockey. ;)

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Thanks Helilog 56 i couln't have said it better. Work for what you want don't expect it to be handed to you. seems to be the way now. the world doesn't owe anyone anything. If you want it work for it. Been at this for 20+ years and have never been on UI or asked anyone to pay my way.

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The difference between achieving a Medical Doctor's degree and a Commerical helicopter pilots license is that when you finally receive you Doctors certification you can go and practice your profession at that moment, although you probably will not be preforming brain surgey. However no one would expect a fully qualified commerical helicopter pilot to jump into a heavy and perform helilogging or precision longline lifting but they do expect you to push a broom. Me thinks that the new Doctor would pass on the broom.

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I disagree

 

When a doctor graduates he becomes an intern and does all the crap work, long hours with little sleep and he learns from the more experienced doctors who run the floor the practical aspects of his craft, he is watched by his pears for 2 years before his is cut loose, there also only certain things he is allowed to do.

 

The newley minted pilot goes through the same type of internship, and he learns what it takes for helicopter company to run, because it not just the pilot that makes thing happen there is a whole support structure ( check your ops manual) that works in harmony to keep it safe and comnpliant with TC regulations. In addition he witnesses and partakes in the praticum of operational flying. As I am sure you are aware , any bozo can fly a helicopter from point A to B, understanding where to place his fuel caches or developing good map reading skills are only some of the things that will get him there. So there is whole **** of alot more the pilot has to learn before he is given a large majority of the companies capital assests along with a proifitable contract to go streaking around at a 120MPH. Opps that drum wasn't grounded properly-TACK! WOOF!

 

So I beg to differ, and to top it all off,you should be happy to know that many operators are frustrated as ****, that insurance rates won't allow them to use lower time guys on some jobs where tarrifs are tight, and when they do hire, try to give every opportunity to the new pilot they can.

 

Anyhow.

 

H

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If me and my doctor switched places for the day who do you think would kill some-one first. People die in helicopters in seconds, there is no chance for some one to step in and fix your mistake. To be a doctor you must serve an internship.

 

But when you are sent out for the day to fly no one can supervise you.

 

To ba an plumber you need a 4 year apprentiship.

 

you are asking a company for thier million $ machine, there reputation, and insurance rate. I was there, I turned a dispatching job into an AME apprentiship, got a raise, maintenance flights, then the full gig. Thats when the fun realy started. Low time guys break ships, scare customers, and generaly are a pain in the ***. I paid the price because the High Timers made me. and you know what, those same guys made me a pilot. $50,000 doesn't mean you are a pilot. Some one has to take the time to teach you, and there fore you have to wash his toilet until he's done teaching you. Moneys tight, nothings free!

 

The reason you have to do the @#$% jobs is simple. There are 100 other guys standing behind you for every 1 entry level flying job. Supply and demand. Yes our industry needs pilots, no offence but until you know what the job is you can't have one. If you think pushing a broom in a warm hanger is hard try sleeping in a tent and bathing in a lake with chunks of ice still floating around. The job of a low timer is to learn his trade, there is such a difference between being a pilot and knowing how to fly a helicopter. The hands and feet are not the part that matters, the difference between safe and dangerious is all between the ears.

 

If you were ready to fly full time some one would send you out. But until you can prove you realy want it, you can just watchem fly by. Your school should have prepared you better, some give you a licence, some give you more.

 

Good Luck and never give up!

Rob

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