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Longline Brushup...


Steve76
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Well I am off to move a drill this week and having not flown a line (or machine...) for 3 months, I thought a discussion about techniques and tricks for better performance on the line might be worthwhile to get the head in the game.

 

So, for all you guru's out there some questions to illuminate us lesser experienced.

 

How do you judge your load height during the final stages of the approach?

 

What airspeed do you aim to maintain to keep the load flying to the spot?

 

Do you try to leave loads 10% below gross for more flexibility?

 

What other clues and tips do you have for those with less time out there doing this?

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Well I am off to move a drill this week and having not flown a line (or machine...) for 3 months, I thought a discussion about techniques and tricks for better performance on the line might be worthwhile to get the head in the game.

 

So, for all you guru's out there some questions to illuminate us lesser experienced.

 

How do you judge your load height during the final stages of the approach?

 

What airspeed do you aim to maintain to keep the load flying to the spot?

 

Do you try to leave loads 10% below gross for more flexibility?

 

What other clues and tips do you have for those with less time out there doing this?

 

Most judge the height of the load by how much time it takes your eyes to focus on each. Target - Load - Target - Load, etc...

 

Don't fly airspeed, fly groundspeed closure. A nice walking pace. That just takes practice and experience. Also depends on a hundred other factors.

 

Leave as much of a Tq buffer as you are comfortable with.

 

Take your time until you get comfortable, get better, then get faster. We don't want to be reading about you in the Vortex. Take er easy out there, I wish I were there too.

 

RH

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I think the best advise I can give you is when you do your safety briefing, don't try and bull #### the crew. Let them know you may be a bit rusty. There is nothing worse than going in all hi and mighty and pancaking in your first pick. Crews will always give a little slack to someone who doesn't come across as" a god in his own mind". Start of slow and steady and you'll be looking like the pro that you probably already are!

 

VX

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Cheers,

I like to add more ideas to the knowledge bank. I also look for the head position of the drillers. Them looking up or down is a good cue to the arrival of the load. Shadowing definately makes the job easier.

I find the big issues always is the lack of power due to changing conditions or the ambitions of the drill crew...

Oh! for an Astar...

 

Any further clues out there lads?

 

Cheers

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Unless you do a detailed weight and balance calculation, how can you tell if you are ten percent under gross?

 

If you insist on underloading your machine, you will have problems with the customer. You may be run off the job. I have seen it happen. They will argue that they are paying for 100% and in fact they will not be satisfied unless you give them 110%.

 

To those who determine the weight of their machines with their buttocks, I know of what your brains are made.

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