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License Conversion


SkyCrane
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Just wondering if anyone has any ideas or input about what it would require to have my Canadian ATP and/or my U.S. ATP converted to a JAA License.

 

Unfortunately there is no easy process...

You have to do all the written exams (all 14 of them) and a flight test, then you may get credit for your type ratings (if you have more than 50 hours on type).

 

This is the only route I'm afraid.

For the IFR part you may have to do the flying in a Full flight sim (AS332 or SK61 if you have those ratings) or in a IFR certified Bell 206. You may find somebody to sponsor the flight test if you are highly experienced in the offshore field, if not, start saving your money now, as if you go to Norway (where I have intimate knowledge of the cost) it will cost you somwhere in the line of $1000/hour for an R44...

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Unfortunately there is no easy process...

You have to do all the written exams (all 14 of them) and a flight test, then you may get credit for your type ratings (if you have more than 50 hours on type).

 

This is the only route I'm afraid.

For the IFR part you may have to do the flying in a Full flight sim (AS332 or SK61 if you have those ratings) or in a IFR certified Bell 206. You may find somebody to sponsor the flight test if you are highly experienced in the offshore field, if not, start saving your money now, as if you go to Norway (where I have intimate knowledge of the cost) it will cost you somwhere in the line of $1000/hour for an R44...

 

Thanks for the input. It sure doesn't sound like there is any easy route to take.

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Its not an easy route at all, as Winnie explained. To elaborate a bit more, there is no real conversion for the JAA. The JAA itself is a mess and still havent figured out what to do with helicopters. Most of the exams are based around airlines and you will find yourself doing weight and balances for jumbo jets and electrical systems from airbuses.

You would have to do the 14 exams to get a frozen ATPL, which becomes void and defaults back to a JAA commercial license if you dont get the JAA IR rating within 2 years of your JAA ATPL frozen license.

You will have to do some flight training for the flight test, and this unfortunately is not a set amount of hours. All depends on what experience (i.e. night, x-country, etc) you have and is up to the school to decide how many hours you need before doing the flight test.

For the most part in Europe you have to do your IR rating in a twin engine aircraft and I beleive there are only 2 places that are authorised to do the IR rating in a single engine helicopter. Either way you are looking at $40,000 U.S. or pounds for the IR rating - cant remember. And doubt you will ever find anyone to sponsor you for that.

Alternatively if you just want a JAA commercial liense you need only do 9 exams, and I believe there are only 2 places that do the 9 exam course.

Most JAA ground school courses are either intensive or modular (taking from 6 months to 1 year classroom time) costing about 6-10,000 pounds sterling. And there is the longdistance learning method which takes about a year (self study from books and internet). Thats costs about 3-5,000 pounds sterling I think.

I would not even bother eith it al - if you want to work offshore just go to CHC or anywhere else in the world other than Europe that doesnt need a JAA license.

Good luck!

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  • 1 year later...

The ridiculous interim system* is about to stop as there will be a specially written ATPL(H) modular (i.e. distance learning) course approved sometime next week (mine!). The only other one outside JAA is HAI in Florida, but that is integrated and residential. Of the CPL(H) courses available in UK, one of them has the same status as Culhane, so be careful.

 

*Currently, helicopter pilots take fixed wing subjects and have them credited, so there are a lot of guys who know the 737 systems in excruciating detail!

 

Transport canada are talking to JAA right now about a bridging system - when i have more info i will post it as i am in contact with both sides.

 

helicopter Services in Wycombe near London use an approved helicopter simulator for the IR, which does indeed need 55 hours, but only the test needs to be taken in a twin, which also needs to be a type on your licence. if you have a canadian IR, you only need to do 15 hours training. Only Bristow have authority to do it in a single, and they have stopped because the instructors are line flying. As for sponsoring, Helicopter services ae training 72 pilots this year from scratch for the IR, sponsored by the helicopter company. two of those are sponsoring people for their CPL(H) as well.

 

you can expect to do at least 10 hours training for the skill test.

 

The cost for a modular course which can take 6 months to complete mon-Fri 9-5, is around 2000 pounds, plus exam fees.

 

As for not bothering - the JAA licence is rapidly replacing the FAA one as a requirement - several people asking for jobs have been asked if they have a JAA licence even if it is not required. Much of Africa is now JAA, and the UAE have merely changed the name to CAR OPS - it is still JAR OPS underneath.

 

Winnie - got a new HF chapter for you in a new version of the book!

 

phil

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  • 1 month later...

What do you think guys? Any thoughts?

 

 

Dear Mr.

 

On 15 November 2005 the European Commission adopted a proposal for the extension of the Scope of Regulation (EC) No. 1592/2002 to air operations, pilot licensing and third country aircraft [COM(2005) 579 final], based on EASA’s Opinion 3/2004. This Commission proposal is going through the co-decision legislative procedure, and it is expected to be adopted by the European Parliament and the Council during the course of 2007. At the same time, the Agency has initiated a rulemaking activity to draft the implementing rules for operations and licensing. Groups OPS.001 and FCL.001 have already started their activities, and the Agency expects to have a Opinion ready to present to the Commission soon after the extension to the EASA Regulation is adopted. This opinion will then be processed through the comitology procedure and become a Commission Regulation. The timings for the applicability of community rules on flight crew licensing and operations is still not clear, since it depends on the results of the legislative process, but there may be European Regulations for flight crew licensing applicable in all Member States from 2008 on. The progress of the work of the EASA groups can be followed on the website www.easa.europa.eu.

 

Regarding your specific question about the requirements for pilots holding licences issued by third countries to fly in Europe, the Commission’s proposal on the extension of scope introduces some significant changes into the existing system, in the sense that it establishes that Member States can only issue licences on the basis of licences issued by third countries as provided for in recognition agreements between the Community and that third country (see article 9 of the Regulation). This means that a licence issued by a third country can only be converted into an European licence on the basis of a bilateral agreement.

On the other hand, article 6a, paragraph 2 of the proposal establishes that, in the case pilots operating aircraft registered in a third country and used by an operator for which any Member State ensures oversight of operations or used into, within or out of the Community by an operator established or residing in the Community, Member States may accept licences and medical certificates issued by or on behalf of a third country. The conditions for the acceptance of these third country licences will be established in the implementing rules that are being developed at the moment.

 

I hope this answers your questions. Please don’t hesitate to contact us should your need any further information.

Best regards,

 

Micaela Verissimo

Rulemaking Officer

European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA)

Postfach 10 12 53 D-50452 Köln, Germany

Visiting address: Ottoplatz 1 D-50452 Köln, Germany

Tel: +49 221 899 90 3018

Fax: +49 221 899 90 3518

Email : micaela.verissimo@easa.europa.eu

Website: www.easa.europa.eu

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Hi albert

Did not even notice the reply I have actually been semi busy for about a month!

 

Anywho, looking forward to seing the looseleaf version!

 

And too bad I already have a frozen ATPL.. from Europe I mean, or I would have taken your course!

 

Cheers

H.

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Busy, huh? Yeah same here! Back home tomorrow so will send you the new chapter

 

You should see the diagrams now -bellissimo!

 

Rob Wood at premier is just about to start doing an online Canadian CPL(H) based on my stuff - should be ready by fall.

 

I will be doing the JAA one just after - no point until I actually get the approval which is RSN. Then the US one after that.

 

Phil

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