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Training In The Okanagan Bc


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I did my piston time on the 300 and thoroughly enjoyed it as an a/c. I have also seen the results of 3 crashes in the 300 and none of them had to do with the safety of the a/c or how it relates as a trainer. One of them was fuel contamination and the low time pilot did a great job of getting it on the ground with little damage to the a/c. I would say from my experience that it is a good solid trainer.

 

In regards to the R22, I have no experience so I hesitate to offer an opinion. However, I will say that I have read Mr. Robinson's own words and have seen the results of failed practice auto's. I have also heard from experienced check pilots their absolute distaste for it as a trainer. Look at the occurance of R22 incidents listed in the Canadian publication: Aviation Safety Letter. However, not just the R22 is there either. Then again, I know of experienced pilots who won't fly an Astar.

 

In regards to the link given and the article regarding the safety of different a/c, I would like to see stats specifically regarding a/c used in the training enviroment. I think that it is hard to compare commercial flying accidents and a/c reliability with those that happen in the training enviroment. I don't think the stats given in the article were conclusive in this regards. Rather it looked at the whole spectrum of differing a/c used in all circumstances and gave stats for this comparison.

 

In regards to programs, I entered for a 100 hour program, but ended up with about 125 hours. I would agree that the time spent in training after my course was done was very useful in helping my confidence and I think it went a long way in getting me my first job.

 

Just my two cents, and thanks for the read while sipping my coffee.

 

cheers

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Then how much do you charge an hour?

Ah----would you believe I do it for nothing because I enjoy helping others fullfill their flying dreams!!

Just wish that is the tack that most people would take instead of trying to profit from these people all the time.

Thanks.

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An instructor can teach you to fly in anything.

 

For what it's worth the R22 and 300CBi are the 2 most popular trainers on the planet... probably for a good reason too. We can argue back and forth about stats and characteristics for an eternity without coming to a definitive conclusion about which truely is best. Both are helicopters, the rest is trivial.

 

Both make good pilots when trained by great instructors.

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An instructor can teach you to fly in anything.

 

For what it's worth the R22 and 300CBi are the 2 most popular trainers on the planet... probably for a good reason too. We can argue back and forth about stats and characteristics for an eternity without coming to a definitive conclusion about which truely is best. Both are helicopters, the rest is trivial.

 

Both make good pilots when trained by great instructors.

 

yup. What they put in (which is usually good training), and what you decide to take out make the real difference.

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Ah----would you believe I do it for nothing because I enjoy helping others fullfill their flying dreams!!

Just wish that is the tack that most people would take instead of trying to profit from these people all the time.

Thanks.

 

 

And it's so much cheaper in the states. At least there, you can get to be an instructor after your commercial, here you need 250 PIC (I wish i had).

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Hey vol,

I have met a few guys that built their time in the states as an instructor with 250 hrs. The one in particular that I met had 1500 -2000 hrs. and was probably one of the most dangerous pilots I have ever met. He had been there and done it all, his experience sounded impressive till you saw him fly. 3-4 guys in a jetranger in the summer with 2 hours of fuel....better pilot than me. Anyway my point is that an instructor with that little time will undoubtedly learn more from his student than vice versa.

 

ya get what ya pay for

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Does anyone else have a problem with an instructor who knows next to nothing training someone who knows nothing!?!?

MC

 

Yes Max I do have that problem, I've been gathering the books for home school ground training, but have to admit I'm not comfortable with someone with 110 hours training me to fly a machine. As I'm an EX military wrench bender and understand that flying these machines are anything but simple this industry is not easy to gain experience either north or south of the border. it would be nice if more companies would allow rookie pilots time for flying lesser missions, ie. powerline patrol, airel(sp) survey, mapping photography and such for hour building and experience training.

 

With the understanding that machines cost money, there is also the fact that training is a benefit to the growth of a company and their pilots and ground crews. one cannot live without the other, so lets make sure how tuff both jobs are!

 

fly safe everyone and don't ever take for granted those who keep you in the air :punk:

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Got my PL in 1960. This much I've surmised about flying and life over the years hence..........

 

1) Lawyers and insurance companies are the ones who run this world in reality. Others also have great powers, but all powerful people and corporations have insurance companies and legal departments who they check with first before any actions........the costs for not doing so are too exorbitant to do otherwise. This fact also applies to the customers who charter aircraft for their employees to use........and they exercise that Right to dictate the experience level of the pilots who fly them around. It's not nice and many times not fair, but has always been there........******. Sometimes idiocy takes over and you are required to have a certain amount of experience before you are allowed to fly in the Arctic Islands for example.............but nobody will allow you to go to that locale to gain that experience. Even in everyday life, there is little if anything, that one does without some insurance company or some part of the legal profession having set the "rules of engagement". It is ALL being done because someone, somewhere, wants their "butt covered" in case of a foul-up and a resultant court ruling.......nothing more,,,,,,nothing less.

 

2) It is safe to assume that practically everybody in every trade and profession wants to be trained by those with the most experience in that field. Anyone that wants different is therefore different than the norm. I'm sorry to report also that after 250 PIC, me and tons of others had just enough experience to find our ***** with two hands and a flashlight. Teach someone else about how to do the same thing as we were doing...........with the "tools of knowledge" that we had garnered over 250 hrs.............and much of that spent idling? We could mechancially handle the helicopter and knew what most things did to enable us to do that. Unfortunately, those of us who survived also found out something else over the eons since............... it was a license to START learning..............and NOTHING more. What we had accomplished was passing the "minimal acceptable standards" set by the government to obtain a pilot's license. We were not all equal in ability for having done so, but some of us actually thought that that we were. Sometimes many of us had felt the same after passing another test.........for our Driver's Test. Even more daunting, is what you learn as the decades role by............when you finally reach the point where you perhaps THINK that you've finally learned it all........ well friend, God gave man TWO ears and ONE mouth for a very good reason............so go ahead and think you've "mastered the art"..............but first give strong consideration to another trade or profession before you get zipped-up in a heavy black or green plastic bag for your last homeward journey, along with possible other bags holding the remains of those who accompanied you.

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