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What Was He Thinking?


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Well, Sorry Folks, I just have to jump in on this one! That is without a doubt the most idiotic video I have ever seen! Get a grip for Christs--e, this is 2006. How many years have we been trying to improve conditions and safety in our industry and then some "IDIOT" has the gall to film something like that, and worst of all, posts it on Youtube. Sets a real good example for the young up and commers. This pilot (note small case letters) apparently has already dumped a machine at Tumbler Ridge, you would think he would have learned something from that. Apparently not. My prediction, (and I have usually been right in the past) is it will just be a matter of time befor he kills himself. I just hope he does'nt take some poor innocent sap with him. Typical young guy, "Young, Dumb and Full of ***". My only regret is I'm not his boss, I would can his sorry a-s in a heartbeat.

Oh, and by the way, the flying was not all that good, lots of minor corrections, altitude corrections, etc, very ameturish. And for all you boys out there who think that type of flying will not hurt a 500, think again! There is no faster way to throw a 500 out of track than that. A 500 hates that type of abuse! She will bite you big time eventually, cracked blades, head, etc.

Fly Safe Guys and Gals

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The credits should have read "No Morons Died During The Filming Of This Video" Which is a shame cause clearly there are to many Morons flying around!

 

"The pilot in question is someone that i have spent a lot of time with over the years and he is a good guy.....he just likes to push the envelope a little far sometimes. " See above!

 

I can't believe the thread has turned into a discussion on weather or not the 500 can handle that type of flying. Pretty sure that the type will not be at issue when you clip a tree, a cliff, hit wires...etc. In fact a 500 might be the perfect rollcage to be in when natural selection occurs!

 

 

What a dumbass!

 

P

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Fenestron

I don't know if you are aware that the 407 that did that roll was from Germany. It is now in Canada in one of the few 407 jigs getting checked out. Rumor has it it might never get a C of A ever again.

 

I thought it was from somewhere else, and I didn't know it was back here in a jig. At the very least Bell now has a very good example to use as a guage for how well their aircraft handle aerobatics.

 

 

Fenstron,

I can't imagine why you so vigourously defend the actions of the pilot in the video or anyone else who wants to pump his 'look what I can do' attitude.

 

Whatever your motives, I hope I don't work in the same hanger as you.

 

 

you may very well have worked in the same hanger as me already, but be happy in the fact that I assume the worst happens everytime that aircraft dissappears over the horizon and my maintenenace reflects that. I assume every jetranger, 500, and A-star has pulled a hammerhead that day and I look at everything leaving no stone unturned. Thats my job.

 

If you think a few hard manouvers turn a good aircraft into a death trap, go get another job.

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With regards to that Bell 407, It was from South Africa. If you find the reg and the serial number, you can do a search from Bell, and find the serial number retired...

 

The machine will never fly again.

 

I heard rumors of another video from a company I used to work with, but I have not been able to find it yet. ANother proof of pilots not thinking.

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<_< Wow, talk about a formula for disaster :down:

 

I wonder if Mr. K (Mav) D. has been here on this site reading the posts. Still feel good about it K.D.? It would be interesting to hear if the owner (operator) of the 500 has seen the clip, and what he/she thinks about that stunt (maybe they don't care). None the less, the moral of the story........be careful, you never know who's watching.... ;)

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you may very well have worked in the same hanger as me already, but be happy in the fact that I assume the worst happens everytime that aircraft dissappears over the horizon and my maintenenace reflects that. I assume every jetranger, 500, and A-star has pulled a hammerhead that day and I look at everything leaving no stone unturned. Thats my job.

 

If you think a few hard manouvers turn a good aircraft into a death trap, go get another job.

 

I hope some day I can work with such greatness! I would feel so safe!!!

 

The fact that you defend ole Maverick and think that every pilot has his or her head up their respective ***** like he does, clearly states you are dilusional. In fact I am sure you have offended about 99% of drivers in saying so.

 

 

It is just a comfort to know that you are out there in some hanger ensuring the safety of the Moron Brigade! I think you might be in the running for DOM of that outfit!

 

I repeat Dumbass!

P

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With regards to that Bell 407, It was from South Africa. If you find the reg and the serial number, you can do a search from Bell, and find the serial number retired...

 

The machine will never fly again.

 

I heard rumors of another video from a company I used to work with, but I have not been able to find it yet. ANother proof of pilots not thinking.

 

 

 

LETTER FROM BELL HELICOPTER

 

SPECIAL INSPECTION PROCEDURES

 

ATTACHMENT A to Letter August 30, 2004

 

 

The following actions will be required in order to evaluate the continued airworthiness of Model 407 Serial Number 53078

 

A. Permanent removal from service is required for the following components:

 

a. All metal components of the main rotor hub assembly including

the elastomeric components and blade bolts

b. Main rotor mast assembly

c. Boosted main rotor fixed and rotating controls, including the

swashplate assembly and support.

d. Main rotor control hydraulic actuators, and the support casting.

e. Flight control bolts in the boosted control system.

f. Drive system components to include tail rotor drive shafts,

bearings, hangers, flex couplings and splined adapters.

g. Input (Ka-Flex) drive shaft

h. Transmission top case

i. Transmission-mounted flight control bellcranks and support

brackets.

j. Tail rotor mast

k. Tail boom and attach hardware

l. Pylon support structure including the pylon side beams, corner

mounts, longitudinal pitch restraints, stop fittings and

associated attachment hardware.

 

B. Components requiring complete inspection and overhaul at

Bell Helicopter:

 

a. Main and tail rotor blades

b. Main rotor yoke assembly

c. Tail rotor yoke assembly

 

C. Components to be overhauled by a facility suitable to Bell (Bell

Tennessee/CSR):

 

a. Transmission assembly

b. Freewheel assembly

c. Tail rotor gearbox

D. Airframe inspection by qualified personnel suitable to Bell:

a. Fuselage structure for evidence of cracks or distortion

b. Instrument panel console for evidence of distortion

c. Battery and ballast weight supports

d. Cabin roof beam assembly

e. Roll-over bulkheads

 

Page 2:

 

f. Vertical control tunnel

g. Engine deck for cracks, distortion evidence

h. Tail boom attachment fittings and longerons

i. Horizontal stabilizer

j. Vertical and auxiliary fins

 

In support of the above return to service action, the aircraft interior shall be removed and other systems and controls as necessary to permit close and rigid visual inspection of the entire fuselage structure as recommended above. Prior to release

for return to service, items not listed above shall be inspected in accordance with the basic aircraft 300 hour / annual inspection.

 

Any material abnormalities or discrepancies identified during the conditional inspection are to be reported to Product Support Engineering - Light Helicopters, for evaluation.

 

Items listed above that are to be permanently removed from service are deemed unsuitable for use, and shall be destroyed, permanently marked or otherwise disfigured so as to prevent inadvertent installation on an operational helicopter.

 

Upon completion of the actions above, a written statement should be provided to PSE Light by responsible person(s). Upon review and agreement, Bell Helicopter will issue a Special Conditional Acceptance (SCA) statement to cover the continued

airworthiness of the helicopter. This SCA will be provided to the appropriate Regulatory authority with the recommendation to return the ship to flightworthy service.

 

Reference: Attachment A, JD2004-039

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