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Whats Fair For A Wrench?


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Guest graunch1

Some F/W companies I know give their prospective employees a skills test. However it is usually along the line of a theoretical snag or a specific task. During the test the evaluator is mainly looking to see if the person knows how to find the correct info in the AMM, source the correct parts and use the proper tools.

This goes along with the theory that if the person knows how to find the information,uses the correct tools and is prepared to follow an AMM then they have the correct grounding to prove their value as an AME.

Yes the industry runs on time but sacrificing time for quality and professionalism is usually where the problems start.

No matter how good the AME is, if he can't say no to unresonable pressure then he is not the kind you want working for you.

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+1 yes book smarts...... case in point recently.....an accident happened because manuals were not followed. important notes regarding the proper set-up were not followed. And the ending was disastrous.

 

I think both go hand in hand, you need to be efficient, and you need to be book smart. A test of your abilities would encompass both, and be vital in determining your skill level and subsequent pay level and expectations on performance.

 

And +1 on the engineer putting his foot down on unreasonable time lines....sometimes it just can't be done. There is a median time frame, some will be quicker, some will be slower and many will be in the middle. The extremes of being too quick or too slow are what you have to watch out for.

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Love the idea of the A.M.E. test! Why not?

And yes Fen...I flip when someone tells me they can turn the ship around in 2 days for a 1200hr or a "T" inspection.

Yes it can be done with a team but the general consensus of "newer engineers" is that they "don't work at night"!!!!

This has nothing to do with fatigue...it has everything to do with quality of life.

Well.......the ships don't fly at night. The whole point is to generate revenue for ourselves and the company. Why should someone who clearly doesn't get it deserve 100,000.00 + a year!?!?

Yeah...I'll get the old school fart slagging but....The Alberta "bubble " has popped.

We just don't know it yet.

All the contract guys who were relying on cashing in on the shortage are soon to be quite surprised.

You have to be careful with wages..as it's hard to roll back wages when it gets thin.

Most should be hoping for a BIG fire season.

Again..just my opinion.

Max

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Ok, y'all..... Here's a question that's sure to spark some discussion.... How long does it take to do a 100 hour (no snags) inspection on a BH-06? Time constraints or no time constraints, are you doing EVERYTHING the sheets call up? If not, why not? Remember, it's your licence and like it or not, you're responsible! 1 day, 1 week???? Nope, you haven't been on the ship all summer and don't know it inside out. Even if you were is that an excuse for skipping items?? Let's be honest and see the replies.......... Then we can talk about timed tests, compentency etc etc. The old story of it's in the "eye of the beholder........."

 

R...

 

 

 

+1 yes book smarts...... case in point recently.....an accident happened because manuals were not followed. important notes regarding the proper set-up were not followed. And the ending was disastrous.

 

I think both go hand in hand, you need to be efficient, and you need to be book smart. A test of your abilities would encompass both, and be vital in determining your skill level and subsequent pay level and expectations on performance.

 

And +1 on the engineer putting his foot down on unreasonable time lines....sometimes it just can't be done. There is a median time frame, some will be quicker, some will be slower and many will be in the middle. The extremes of being too quick or too slow are what you have to watch out for.

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i haven't done a straight 100 hr inspection in a while and the last ones i was doing were done over several nights progressively and since i was working on POS ratbags, there were always snags. So I can't really give you a fair number.

There are so many variables too, each company has a maintenence sched that differs from everyone elses to some degree. One companies 100hr will just cover the bare essentials from the Bell Manual, other companies have tacked on all these special inspections that can easily double your work.

If you're on the ship all the time, many items are checked daily as your routine and can be comfortably signed off when inspection is due. If you're new to the ship after a crew change, you'd be a fool not to spend the time and check everything....

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Let's just use the Bell Maintenance Manual 100 hour sheets........... Then it's all on an even playing field. <_<

 

Nobody doing 100 hours on 206s or???

 

R...

 

i haven't done a straight 100 hr inspection in a while and the last ones i was doing were done over several nights progressively and since i was working on POS ratbags, there were always snags. So I can't really give you a fair number.

There are so many variables too, each company has a maintenence sched that differs from everyone elses to some degree. One companies 100hr will just cover the bare essentials from the Bell Manual, other companies have tacked on all these special inspections that can easily double your work.

If you're on the ship all the time, many items are checked daily as your routine and can be comfortably signed off when inspection is due. If you're new to the ship after a crew change, you'd be a fool not to spend the time and check everything....

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Let's just use the Bell Maintenance Manual 100 hour sheets........... Then it's all on an even playing field. <_<

 

Nobody doing 100 hours on 206s or???

 

R...

 

 

Ok let put this into perspective I have been silent long enough on this topic. You can pull a number out of the air put that isn't realistic. Although 20 man hours is a good ballpark. Have you been at a base with a machine that has been flying if so cut that time by 1/3. Are you in camp? If so Add 1/3rd. It is all about the conditions under which your operating. Are you with and independant AMO and haven't seen the machine before or likely not to again add 1/2 to the total time. If you use the Bell Maint. Manual (all Company check sheets are based on them!) you should take all the time you need to comfortably sign that book. All of you can pull any number you want from the air but it still comes down to skill/experience level.

A B206 engineer usually doesn't have the pleasure or a team to get an inspection done for the next day. Most of the time (in my experience) its you at night by yourself in the rain and bugs or hangar if your lucky. You work most of the night or two and get up with the pilot for leak check test flight the next morning before the customer even shows up.

If the customer goes out that day and never see's me and has no idea I had the machine ripped apart a few short hours earlier. I have done my Job properly and safely. I have no trouble being in the background making sure things are funtioning properly.

Thats how I sleep at night

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Hey Offset, thanks for the input.......... It's what we need, however you'll note that in my original post, I mentioned no snags and a ship that you haven't been with all summer etc. Just an everyday plain 100 hour. In a hangar if you want with the tools you need. Let's not read too much into it, I'm just trying to show that even with experience times will vary dramatically. So......... Let's see the times, guys.

 

R...

 

 

Ok let put this into perspective I have been silent long enough on this topic. You can pull a number out of the air put that isn't realistic. Although 20 man hours is a good ballpark. Have you been at a base with a machine that has been flying if so cut that time by 1/3. Are you in camp? If so Add 1/3rd. It is all about the conditions under which your operating. Are you with and independant AMO and haven't seen the machine before or likely not to again add 1/2 to the total time. If you use the Bell Maint. Manual (all Company check sheets are based on them!) you should take all the time you need to comfortably sign that book. All of you can pull any number you want from the air but it still comes down to skill/experience level.

A B206 engineer usually doesn't have the pleasure or a team to get an inspection done for the next day. Most of the time (in my experience) its you at night by yourself in the rain and bugs or hangar if your lucky. You work most of the night or two and get up with the pilot for leak check test flight the next morning before the customer even shows up.

If the customer goes out that day and never see's me and has no idea I had the machine ripped apart a few short hours earlier. I have done my Job properly and safely. I have no trouble being in the background making sure things are funtioning properly.

Thats how I sleep at night

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