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Thanks to a break in the weather and some tricky flying, an injured snowshoer stranded on Vancouver's Mount Seymour since Wednesday was rescued by helicopter Friday afternoon.

 

"This pilot is unbelievable in the mountains," said Don Jardine, of North Shore Rescue.

 

Where can one go to become a "unbelievable" and "tricky" pilot???

 

 

Just kidding!

 

Hats off to the pilot, :up: thumbs down to the reporters... :down:

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These are the people worth rescueing. Really sucks to watch reports on people wasting 3 days looking for a snowboarder who went way off track to find better powder or anything like that.

 

Well done both pilot and SAR ground crew.

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Where can one go to become a "unbelievable" and "tricky" pilot???

Just kidding!

 

Hats off to the pilot, :up: thumbs down to the reporters... :down:

 

 

Don Jardine has had first hand appreciation of safe and competent pilots. He and other North Shore Rescue members were themselves rescued by a Lama pilot from Mount Logan a few years back. By their own account, if it had not been for that pilot, they would all not be here.

Well done to Peter and North Shore SAR.

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At what point do we decide (or realize?) that precision flying in tricky wx may indicate that the mission was quite risky, and that we should therefore stop congratulating the "hero"? After all, the first rule of rescue work is, "Don't become another casualty".

 

This is certainly not intended as a jab at the pilot, who I don't know, nor at the mission, the details of which I know little about. For all I know he did a superb job mitigating and managing the risks and flew a very safe mission. My intention is to generate some discussion about risk tolerance vs. intrinsic rewards (saving a life, for instance).

 

As a former mountain rescue professional and more recently as a pilot I have grappled with this question, and occasionally doubted my decisions. How do we, as a community, decide whether someone's a hero or a zero?

 

Cheers,

 

****

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