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Puma Supply Pick Up Off Destroyer


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Someone really needs to teach the Military to Long Line.... :blink:

 

AR

 

It never fails to amaze me how when you give some people a specific skill they think that it is the "be all an end all" to every situation. Longlining is not the answer to everything. In this case it would be the wrong answer.

 

Looking vertically down at a boat / raft that is pitching, rolling, yawing and heaving all at the same time, not to mention the wave action and the rotor wash effect, through a bubble door would be an invitation to disaster. That is why the pro's, the SAR people, get as low as they safely can over the vessel and have the Hoist Operator gives him lateral direction from the open door. This also works for slinging cargo off vessels.

 

Before you go off half cocked, I have over two thousand hours longlining. Additionally I have lots of hoisting experience and have some slinging experience from vessels.

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It never fails to amaze me how when you give some people a specific skill they think that it is the "be all an end all" to every situation. Longlining is not the answer to everything. In this case it would be the wrong answer.

 

Looking vertically down at a boat / raft that is pitching, rolling, yawing and heaving all at the same time, not to mention the wave action and the rotor wash effect, through a bubble door would be an invitation to disaster. That is why the pro's, the SAR people, get as low as they safely can over the vessel and have the Hoist Operator gives him lateral direction from the open door. This also works for slinging cargo off vessels.

 

Before you go off half cocked, I have over two thousand hours longlining. Additionally I have lots of hoisting experience and have some slinging experience from vessels.

 

 

WHOA THERE BIG SHOOTER...... :shock:

 

 

Does the term Tongue in Cheek mean anything to you???? Relax a little, it was a joke. Thanks for the rundown of your resume though, but I too have a substantial amount of long line time, AND have slung off of boats a number of times in the past - hence the **** joke.....

 

Trying to keep up to a 30kt Destroyer with 200ft of line hanging way out behind you, nowhere near land would most certainly NOT be the method of choice - I assumed that was a rather obvious conclusion. Guess not.

 

Pour yourself a drink to take the edge off, just a suggestion.

 

 

AR

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I could name the 'pro's and SAR people I know who can actually longline, on my little finger. There are two now - Reddog and 407 driver. Most dedicated SAR experts have never had more than a bellyhooked line on and the only reason they use a short line is because pretty much anyone can do it with little practice. Longline takes hours of skill building. Plus if the military could longline all those 'crewmen' hanging out the sides would be out of a job. Its just job protectionism...

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Military SAR crews pretty much never sling their lads, it's always by hoist and the lower the better due to time hoisting and references over ships as stated above.

 

As for the ones who do sling, the Sea Kings and Griffons, they use the short lines based on tactical requirements for one reason. They do not want to be up 150 or 200 feet agl, it's a great way to give away your position to your enemies or get picked off by their weapons. Secondly they use the short lines because they carry crewmen to give verbal directions and always sling to ground crews to be able to hook up and deliver as fast as possible, again this is done for military tactics. These reasons do not apply to industry and it makes perfect sense for industry to longline because of the precision they can get by doing so which is much better for the one or two pilots who are alone in those machines.

 

As for the industry rescuers like 407Driver, he too is flying alone and he doesn't have a hoist. If his 407 had a hoist and a crewman he'd likely end up much lower to his targets too.

 

Just because two helicopters can hover, doesn't mean they are the same beasts to be flown the same. There's a time and a place to hook up a load to a 200 foot line and a time and a place to pick one up on a 25 foot strop and haul *** as low as you can to the drop zone.

 

Bottom line is this, helicopters and helicopters pilots and crews rock! Fixed wing sucks! ;)

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Well put Hover-pig. Mission dictates requirement for the skill to be used. Long-line isn't one that comes to mind here, but in the Pacific region, the trees are mighty big, and 300' of cable is needed, that's where the long-line skill is best suited, besides, the amount of rotorwash the Cormorant puts down, one would need 500' of long-line to prevent blowing things over down below. :shock:

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