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An MFC (Most Favored Client) just showed up and presented me with his new Garmin GPSMAP 76 and asked me to; not just upload Mapsource, but show him how to use it. It appears to have the software he wants already loaded but I'm not sure I can train him on the proper use of a GPS unit.

Do we not seem to be relying on this technology too much, or am just a luddite? I like computers too, but not when we have to dispense with maps. I can't do some jobs anymore if the GPS unit in the machine is not working. Yeah, sure, it's a lot more accurate but it has to work!

I'm not at ALL keen on the acceptance of newer pilots to using GPS as a primary means of navigation, but they are being led by customers who insist on it's use.

Okay, maybe I'm a luddite.

Comments?

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BHP206:

Sorry bud, but this subject has been beaten to death already and the consensus was use maps in conjunction with GPS.

 

American pilots years back used to get lost (VFR types) when they came north to Canada, not enough VOR's to navigate to.

 

No matter how you apply it, using whatever navaids available and acceptable in any area you are flying VFR, you are responsible for your own situation awareness and that means map reading. The pilot flying is responsible not the passenger or customer.

 

Don

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if i'm not mistaken, cap and i had this exact same conversation a few years ago... too many people never really learn the art of airmanship and map reading.. GPS and everything else techno has the capability to malfunction!!

 

when the brown fecal material hits the rotating air circulation device, you JUST MIGHT want to know how to read a map and use an E-6B... anyone remember those??? ;)

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I think the issue here is the expectation of this particular customer.... If they show up with a GPS, super, but I'll be damned if I'm going to train them on its use, or provide them with software, or translate points from UTM to something I can navigate by. If they pay my hourly rate, that's a different story, but I've yet to see that happen.

 

My personal favorite is the Gov't types who show up with a site specific map, but no idea where said site is, in that instance, I'm more than happy to spend the time flying around looking for it. Bottom line, if a customer wants to charter an aircraft, they should at least pay you the courtesy of showing up prepared - you do.

 

AR

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I just graduated and during my long cross-country my instructor told me to tune in the GPS for emergency use only. I was flying by the map to CYXR and knew I was close to the zone, I looked at the GPS to get the exact distance and it read like I was in Sudbury.... before you ask it was set correctly. Ever since I don't trust them... if a pilot can't fly with a map and do the calculations in their head then they can't really fly, can they.

 

Just my thoughts...

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Although given all that, I've been told that most customers will give the co-ordinates to where they want to go. So I guess that lat/long and UTM's on the GPS are required for quick departures but you should always have a map set up just in case.... like I said before if I was only using the GPS to Earlton, and was with a customer on their dime... I would've been given my walking papers!

 

Again, just my thoughts

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Hmm! I have learned to use maps when I started training. The instructor would prioritize the map over the GPS, and I thanked them. But after flying for 11 years in the bush VFR, I have come to appreciate this technology. On the VFR side, I would use the GPS mainly for short trips and on long trips I would still use the GPS but my map would be on my lap with my finger on my present position. Because I learned to navigate with a map, I am able to notice any errors that the GPS might produce. Let's face it, the GPS is a useful tool to reduce pilot work load. The really problem is not being able to navigate with a map if we use the GPS, it's how much we tend to push the weather a little further BECAUSE the GPS is tracking to our destinations. Do NOT forget that you are VFR not IFR!

 

This technology is the future for IFR, it's replacing the ADF. I was flying in the US and I could not find any NDB in the Buffalo, Rochester area. And many aerodromes that had ADF approaches in Canada are being converted to GNSS/GPS. The GPS has come a long way since civil aviation are permitted to use it. The secret is the user, we have to discipline ourself to use this technology safely and accurately (check the coordinates twice) and it will be efficient.

 

Mike

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