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Hi there,

 

Just a follow-up on a query I made a while ago for A-Star longline tips. These are the ones that worked best for me:

 

-Removed seat back cushion.

-Moved *** to left, sitting kinda on right *** cheek.

-Folded window vent deflector gizmo out window to make more room for helmet.

-Used lower window on door as primary reference to avoid fixating on load; followed load peripherally and as part of scan.

-Left thumb on edge of seat to help gauge collective position/torque.

 

All in all pretty happy with results. Can see load well, control is pretty good, no big swings or anything. Not a lot of time at it yet, not quite ready for drill moves, but with some more practice the accuracy should come.

 

Thanks again to all those who contributed their suggestions!!!

 

****

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Hi there,

 

Just a follow-up on a query I made a while ago for A-Star longline tips. These are the ones that worked best for me:

 

-Removed seat back cushion.

-Moved *** to left, sitting kinda on right *** cheek.

-Folded window vent deflector gizmo out window to make more room for helmet.

-Used lower window on door as primary reference to avoid fixating on load; followed load peripherally and as part of scan.

-Left thumb on edge of seat to help gauge collective position/torque.

 

All in all pretty happy with results. Can see load well, control is pretty good, no big swings or anything. Not a lot of time at it yet, not quite ready for drill moves, but with some more practice the accuracy should come.

 

Thanks again to all those who contributed their suggestions!!!

 

****

 

****,

 

Does "Code 69 in boots, Code 69 in Boots" mean anything to you still??? Saturdays and Herbst with a few dozen GI Lagers will never be the same.......I don't mean to hijack the A-Star Long Line thread (as it is very important) but this must be you.

 

D

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  • 2 weeks later...

The Alouette II was equipped not with a torque meter but with a main blade pitch indicator. I believe the limit was 17 degrees of pitch but this could be reduced to 15 degrees depending on ambient air density. How do you calibrate your thumb? If you overtorque, will you know by how much? You would if you were consulting the gauge. External gauges have been around for years. Put your thumb someplace else.

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Mr Moore,

Perhaps you should read things a little more carefully. I believe the statement about the thumb on the seat said it was to HELP with monitoring the collective/torque position not to RELY on it. No one I know ignores the gauges because their thumb is that accurate.

Im not sure whether you are a pilot or not but if you were a pilot af any experience Im sure you would understand that there is alot of little tips and tricks to help make flying certain jobs alot easier.

Perhaps you should take some of that ultimate helicopter knowledge you have and try and turn it into some better reading skills so then you wouldnt have to make stupid statements yourself.

 

My 2 cents

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Blah blah blah... How do you calibrate your thumb? If you overtorque, will you know by how much? Blah blah blah... External gauges have been around for years... Blah blah blah... Put your thumb someplace else... Blah blah blah...

 

GOOOOOOOOOOOOFFFFFFFFFFFFFF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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