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seamus32

Engine Numbering Systems

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No splitpin you are correct I was nit picking there lol.

My understanding ( and maybe someone can elaborate on it) is that the first 25, 212's were actually 205's that were taken off of the Bell assembly line and turned into 212's thats why they have the 2 invertor, single bus electrical system. Also the US marines got the first 75 UH-1N's, they even took the ones that were going to go to the CAF.

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No splitpin you are correct I was nit picking there lol.

My understanding ( and maybe someone can elaborate on it) is that the first 25, 212's were actually 205's that were taken off of the Bell assembly line and turned into 212's thats why they have the 2 inverter, single bus electrical system. Also the US marines got the first 75 UH-1N's, they even took the ones that were going to go to the CAF.

 

I believe what you say is correct about 205/212 single electric thing, but I cannot find documentation on it.

 

I shamelessly plagiarized the following article from here--http://www.faqs.org/docs/air/avhuey.html#m5

 

In 1965, Bell had experimented with a single twin-engine Model 208 "Twin Delta" Huey prototype, which was a UH-1D fitted with Continental XT67-T-1 engine module, consisting of two T72-T-2 turboshaft engined driving a common gearbox. This exercise was performed as an experiment using company funds.

 

In early 1968, Bell had discussions with the Canadian government and Pratt & Whitney Canada (PWC) that led to an agreement in 1969 to build a twin-engine version of the Model 205. Bell flew a UH-1D fitted with a new PWC "Twin Pac" engine, consisting of two of PWC's popular PT6 turbines driving a common gearbox, in 1969.

 

This prototype led to the production "Twin Huey" or "Model 212 / UH-1N", essentially a UH-1H fitted with the PWC T400-CP-400 (PT6T-3) Twin Pac, providing a total of 1,530 horsepower. Each turbine module of the Twin Pac could actually provide 900 horsepower each, but the rotor system couldn't deal with 1,800 horsepower. However, in the event of a failure of one of the turbines, the remaining operational turbine could be run at its full 900 horsepower output.

 

Bell began deliveries of the UH-1N to the US Air Force in 1970 which obtained 79 and used them for special operations. The US Navy and Marine Corps were particularly interested in the type, as the twin-engine configuration provided greater flight safety for overwater operations, and had obtained a total of 221 by 1978. Two standard Marine UH-1Ns were converted to "VH-1N" VIP transports, and six Model 212s were built new to this standard for the Corps as well.

 

The Canadian Armed Forces, which had backed development of the type, received their first Model 212 on 3 May 1971, with the last of 50 delivered about a year later. The CAF originally designated the type the "CUH-1N", but this was later changed to "CH-135".

 

As you can see, Canada came up with the idea of the 212 but the Yanks scooped us on delivery times. God-da-n Carpetbaggers! :D:D

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so if the twinpac in a 212 is considered a single engine, why does the aircraft have a #1 instrument stack and a #2 instrument stack, #1 fire light/handle and a #2 fire light/handle, etc ?? :D:D

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had an egnie failure once in a 212, landed, no problems, pilot flying says to me, I can';t shut the engine down, so i pull the fire handle on the failed engine, there its shut down i say, he looks at me, with a kinda look that you would see in a comedy movie, :punk: "its the other engine thats runnning" :D :punk:

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3B Because it has two powerplants, a number 1 (on the left in a 212) and a number 2 (on the right). Good question about the 58T earlier, as I never thought about it being in backwards. Are there any 58T's in Canada? I know Construction in the states operates them. By the way, we are just talking semantics here the 212 is a two engine aircraft, P&W just considers the twin pac one engine.

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you're right about the first 212's being converted 205's - I've flown one of them, and seen another. to make it weirder the last 205's were reconverted 212 hulls.

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Was that possibly C-FBHF serial # 9, I worked on it with HoverLover on the QCM railroad.

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