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I'm getting ready to begin my flight training, and have 2 schools in mind. I've visited both and believe both would be good for me, but the deciding factor would be the weather in which I train. One is in southern California (san diego) and the other is in Oregon (portland). With the California school I could count on moslty clear skies and minimal flights grounded due to weather days. However with the rain and weather of oregon, would that make me better prepared down the road in my pilot career(training in the tough weather)? Or would the weather of southern california be enough to prepare me? One of my goals is to fly in alaska. Thanks in advance for any input.

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Hey there, I think training in the bad weather is a huge plus! It won't be such a horrifying shock when you get in it. I just spent 4 months in the high arctic and flew in some weather that I don't even care to talk about. I think training in weather, higher altitude is great. weather can be the worst experience you will have flying so you might as well learn as much about it as you can...my coouple cents

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Now that is excellent advice......take the opportunity to train under all conditions.

 

The sooner you get that exposure........along with good advice in helping develope your "situational awarnesss", the better the foundation , for becoming a professional pilot :up:

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Go training in Oregon. Learning and flying in perfect skys is a joy yes, but like the others say you're not doing yourself any favors what so ever. Learn to fly in the muck with an instructor sitting beside you.... not a customer.

 

Another way to think of it. Say you go thru your complete course and never once had a day where the weather stopped you from flying. What kind of precedent is this teaching you?

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Sir,

 

I am not an instructor, but I was trained by well qualified ones who had years of experience in the "Great White North". Flying in marginal weather with a VFR licence is a matter of knowledge re: your environment and ultimately your ability to "pull the plug". It ain't written down as such but you gotta learn to wait. If you have the opportunity to train with an experienced bush pilot instructor and have to wait out a storm/squall/icing in the bush then you will be well on your way to surviving any PDM issues that may conflict with your client/company time issues AT THE TIME.

 

Do the Oregon thing...in December...There is Mountains, Ocean, and Icing halfway up the hill, and some Columbia drivers/hangar right in your back yard if you have the wherewhithal to say Hi. They won't give you a job but they are interesting to talk to. The girls aren't wearing bikini's when you land but the wine and coffee are good, and the Gold Coast is Beutiful.

 

Zazu

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  • 2 months later...
Thanks for all the opinions, I really appreciate the info from experienced pilots.

 

Hello,

 

If you are interested in flying in Alaska as a career, please consider a look at Alyeska Helicopters. We are a helicopter flight school located in Chugiak, Alaska, which is just north of Anchorage. We train in the R-22 or the R-44. www.alyeskahelicopters.com

 

Good luck,

 

Marcus

CFI

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