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214 St's


canuck
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For longlining out of them well they are ok, need an extension to the seat (side) to be comfortable leaning out into the bubble window, it is a wide aircraft.

Need to get use to the collective, it more like a "vertical/horizontal pull" than our regular "pull up collective" . kind of pull back more than pull up.

 

Reddog you are not too far from the truth as far as speed goes but it is not THAT BAD. I worked down there (South America)I know how they operate, That was not an Aircraft problem but a "behind the steering problem"

But i have to say that you will not do production work with this thing and you will need a smooth pilot to "work them" simply because of the aircraft systems (SCAS, FBW Fly by Wire, etc)they won't permit any roughness and will bite back if you do,it can be scary. As long as the systems can keep up with your inputs everything will be OK. You CAN be quick but you CAN'T rush them.

 

HTSC had 2 of them recertified "single pilot, left seat, VFR only ST's) for longLine operation. Simply said they moved evrything on the left side. One crashed this summer and it is a "writeoff" only one is left now. The others were kept original meaning IFR aircrafts.

The ST and the B model are 2 different aircraft. As far as I know only the head (not the blades) and the tailrotor are the same.

The B model is a superb lifter, the ST is an honest lifter but a superb cruiser, you will go somewhere and a long way.

The 214 is a special order from Iran the A model came out first (piece of #@&% I was told) then the B model. Iran asked for a 214 with 2 engine hence the 214ST, Bell kept it simple. ST stands for "Super Transport" but it had a different meaning at the start. The original name just doesn't come up to my mind right now.

 

125 were built and I was told that there are only 15 specimens flying in 2007.

 

Being at 17500 gross weight it is in the heavy category, it is certified for 7900 pounds on the hook. Certified for 18 pax when all the seats are in.

 

I like flying them, lots of fuel in standard tanks, they are relatively fast, beautifull engines never had any problems with them and they will KEEP flying on one if need be.

 

Jacques

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The ST and the B model are 2 different aircraft. As far as I know only the head (not the blades) and the tailrotor are the same.

 

 

Jacques

 

The head is the same and the blades are the same profile and construction but one foot longer each.

The tail rotor blades are the same but the hub is longer so the diameter overall is larger.

 

The transmission cases are the same but the gears are different. I think the servos and some of the driveshafts are the same as well. There are common bulkheads and such in the tailboom too but many are different.

 

 

There are many other common parts but overall, as you say, they are two completely different aircraft.

 

Yes it was called the "Stretched Twin" in the design phase.

 

Cheers

Jim

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The head is the same and the blades are the same profile and construction but one foot longer each.

The tail rotor blades are the same but the hub is longer so the diameter overall is larger.

 

The transmission cases are the same but the gears are different. I think the servos and some of the driveshafts are the same as well. There are common bulkheads and such in the tailboom too but many are different.

There are many other common parts but overall, as you say, they are two completely different aircraft.

 

Yes it was called the "Stretched Twin" in the design phase.

 

Cheers

Jim

 

Ok Ok Ok I did not design the darn thing I just fly it ha. ha

 

cheers jim

 

Jacques

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What are they like to longline out of? Well, I'll tell yah young feller. I was on a pipeline job in the Andes along side of an ST back in '89 and we were lapping them like crazy with a Super Puma. They had to keep running for fuel every 45 minutes or so and we were hauling the same loads with two and half hours fuel. They could barely lift the loads and we were constantly hovering behind them with ours waiting for them to either get moving with or drop their loads so what's that tell you about how they longline?

 

I actually had the priveledge of sitting beside JacDor for a drill move up north in '06. I think the pilot makes a huge difference. To this day I haven't seen anyone as good as Jacques swingin' a 6000lb drill on a 100ft line. I learned more about long-lining in that 20 minute flight than anywhere else before or since... :up:

 

The ST is an impressive machine. When Jacques would come in for a drill move, we could hear the bladeslap full 5 minutes before we could spot him across the reservoir (about 5 nm), and he was cruising at somewheres around 130 kts :o

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Actually I'm guilty of omission Skidz, that longline job to which I referred was between five and seven thousand feet ASL up in the Andes. Nothing maintains it's performance at altitude like a Super Puma. The poor old ST was sucking wind so bad we come hear it in our machine.

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Thanks for the vote of confidence Skids.

 

Glad you liked it.

 

Jacques

 

Hey Jacques! I won't tell any of the stories I know but they all end up saying much of what Skids said! My stories would be too 'absorbing' for the general public!!

 

I can't imagine the ST sucking much wind when you fly it except maybe into the engine intake. Somehow I doubt that the ST is much affected by altitude either. However I know little of the Puma series except they are good performing aircraft as well. Too bad they don't helilog with them anymore.

 

Cheers

Jim

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