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Dumb Noob Question About (short!) Pilot Height...


Daz
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I am 6'2 and I fit fine in the 22, however I don't think a helmet would have fit. Didn't matter cause I couldn't afford a helmet at that point anyways. The R22 is an excellent helicopter and that is why it is one of the highest selling machnines ever! the 300 may be nice to fly aswell however it is a dying breed and is not used operationaly anywhere. As far as a left hand drive? well unless you get in a 500, all the machines 44, 206L's & B's and most A-stars are right hand drive weather you are longlining or not. Kim's B3 at RK is a very unique heli with that left hand drive, you won't see that much. I am a firm believer in the Robinson products, training on a 22 and learning everything about that machine is a huge advantage when you get on a 44 at 100 hrs or so.

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I was pretty sure Kim's B3 wasn't the norm (and now I know - thanks!) - I mentioned it out of curiosity. Further to that - I wonder why he'd have his set up on the left side when it's the norm to be flying on the right?

 

I've heard/read good things about training in the 300 - I know you like it, Cole - but I kinda thought that training in a 22 might make the transition to the 44 a little easier. Is it true that more and more operators are starting to use 44s?

 

As always, thanks all for your thoughts and insight!

 

-Darren

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do your 100hrs in the 22, and with a quick glance of the POH, you should be able to jump in and fly away with the 44 & 206. worked that way for me. the 22 is a squirly little platform and will exploit any weekness far faster then the 300. harder initially, but pays off down the road.

 

I watch the 300 pilots at my current school try the 206 and they have far more trouble on average then the 22 jockeys.

 

the 22 is much faster. I'm forever passing 300's on xcountry trips, and having to slow down in a pattern.

 

why fly something thatlooks like a pingpong ball with a tail anyways? :blink:

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Well, may as well set the recored straight on this one!

 

Short Guys/ Gals= Fly 300,R22,BH06

 

Tall Guys/ Galls= Fly 350, 205,204,Sk76,Crane etc.

 

Don't like it.... Too Bad! Its the natural order of things. :lol:

Most the time its short guy who starts the fight.. is the asshoool... or places the knife in the back... not the big guys who have nothing to prove.. seen it time and agian, its no longer a theory its law.

 

Most of the time anyway.... Don't think the term Napoleon complex was invented for nothing do ya!

 

of course like anything there are exceptions.

 

 

So, you are a short guy then???? :down: Not really getting a warm fuzzy here.

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Well, may as well set the recored straight on this one!

 

Short Guys/ Gals= Fly 300,R22,BH06

 

Tall Guys/ Galls= Fly 350, 205,204,Sk76,Crane etc.

 

Don't like it.... Too Bad! Its the natural order of things. :lol:

Most the time its short guy who starts the fight.. is the asshoool... or places the knife in the back... not the big guys who have nothing to prove.. seen it time and agian, its no longer a theory its law.

 

Most of the time anyway.... Don't think the term Napoleon complex was invented for nothing do ya!

 

of course like anything there are exceptions.

 

 

I hope you are wearing body armor!!! :punk:

 

WW

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I find instructor and school choice to be the main decision, if Wendell taught on the 22, 44, hiller 12... any helicopter I could afford to fly, id still go with him based on the level of instruction and the reputation he has as a pilot. The 300 is just a bonus and a really responsive, fun helicopter to fly. Cross country in it isnt that bad, I never found it "easier" to fly then the 22 after a bit of time at the controls of both.

 

The jump to the 206 is dead simple, again this could be the instructor, but I had no problem hopping into the jetranger and flying it away at all with minimal advice. As far as moving from left to right PIC... not hard at all.

 

You'll find that flying is alot more then just driving a helicopter around, doing some circles, fancy hover excersizes for two dozen hours getting the hover absoutely rock solid etc, alot of it's about decision making. Sure you can put it in that area that has no margin for error but why risk it when the field next to it is wide open? Bad pilots arent bad pilots because of the type they trained on.

 

So does the choice of helicopter make or break the pilot, obviously not, look at the diversity among high time pilots, some r22 some 47 some 300. At 10000 hours, less then a percent of your time will have been in the helicopter you did your licence on.

 

For the original question- After a couple hours in the jetranger, I think being a few inches shorter is probably more of a blessing than anything haha. 4 hours sitting in there today and my back is about ready to snap haha.

 

Bottom line no matter what helicopter you choose to fly, make sure its with a good instructor who really knows how to teach... spending a few hundred bucks on a couple fam flights doesnt seem like a waste of money if you put it next to wasting thousands because your instructor isnt allowing you to reach your full potential.

 

Have fun!

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Great post Cole; thanks!

 

I find instructor and school choice to be the main decision

 

Very true. I plan on doing a couple fam flights to help me find the right intructor, machine, and school.

 

Regarding asking about the different machines - I'm just obsessing and asking lots of questions about everything 'cause I really, really like this stuff :D

 

You'll find that flying is alot more then just driving a helicopter around, doing some circles, fancy hover excersizes for two dozen hours getting the hover absoutely rock solid etc, alot of it's about decision making

 

I'm lucky in that my current line of work requires good risk management, evaluation of human factors, and risk-based decision making - and requires it every day. As an avalanche technician, the decisions I make can potentially hurt or kill me, my co-workers and/or skiing guests. Interestingly, one of the courses I've taken (CAA Level 2 Module 1) used modified course material borrowed straight from aviation-related decision making seminars. I've been fortunate enough to have this formal training, as well as experience in the field using the training.

 

Hopefully these skills (not to mention my obsession with meteorology!) will translate well to the rotary wing world.

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All of that and some motor skills you should do just fine.

 

I dont know how much youve looked around on vertical here,... but being obsessed about the machines and for that matter, asking a tonne of questions is what ive been doing since helicopters were something I rode in once in a while and dreamt about flying.

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I find instructor and school choice to be the main decision, if Wendell taught on the 22, 44, hiller 12... any helicopter I could afford to fly, id still go with him based on the level of instruction and the reputation he has as a pilot. The 300 is just a bonus and a really responsive, fun helicopter to fly. Cross country in it isnt that bad, I never found it "easier" to fly then the 22 after a bit of time at the controls of both.

 

The jump to the 206 is dead simple, again this could be the instructor, but I had no problem hopping into the jetranger and flying it away at all with minimal advice. As far as moving from left to right PIC... not hard at all.

 

You'll find that flying is alot more then just driving a helicopter around, doing some circles, fancy hover excersizes for two dozen hours getting the hover absoutely rock solid etc, alot of it's about decision making. Sure you can put it in that area that has no margin for error but why risk it when the field next to it is wide open? Bad pilots arent bad pilots because of the type they trained on.

 

So does the choice of helicopter make or break the pilot, obviously not, look at the diversity among high time pilots, some r22 some 47 some 300. At 10000 hours, less then a percent of your time will have been in the helicopter you did your licence on.

 

For the original question- After a couple hours in the jetranger, I think being a few inches shorter is probably more of a blessing than anything haha. 4 hours sitting in there today and my back is about ready to snap haha.

 

Bottom line no matter what helicopter you choose to fly, make sure its with a good instructor who really knows how to teach... spending a few hundred bucks on a couple fam flights doesnt seem like a waste of money if you put it next to wasting thousands because your instructor isnt allowing you to reach your full potential.

 

Have fun!

 

 

 

 

 

Yup well said, I totally agree, all machines aside, the instructor is the top priority because you will probally come out flying like him! Hey Daz I remember you now, I ran the Nordic a couple years when Chris was in the cat shop, it all comes togaether now! Cheers man

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Yep, I remember those days (and when you ran the Nordic trails). That was back when I was a snowmaker and cat operator. B)

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