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Guest Jerry
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Do you mean the stylish ballcap or the fleece lined flight suit?

Hope he wasn't wearing the knee-high HAC socks....that would really link him to the crime.

 

:blur:

Hepac better take the lead and offer embroidered flannel PJ's when they get approved authentic HEPAC ware on the shelves. Because you just never know when you'll be representing the crew.

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There is one obvious solution to the entire mess, and that is for the individuals involved to make a public statement on the issue. As an industry group, this is the only way forward to ensure that the entire membership of the group is aware of the facts and can then make their decisions based on facts.

 

Once the facts are out there, then it is time for the board to make it's decision on any action to be taken, if they deem it necessary. The President of the organization represents the membership, and serves at their pleasure.

 

Once the board has made it's decision, it is time for the membership to make their decision on this, and some may vote with their feet if this is not taken to an adequate conclusion.

 

Simply ignoring what has occurred will not make the issue go away. This is an industry organization that interfaces with the public and represents the entire Canadian helicopter industry. To do nothing, simply implies that the industry condones the actions that occurred - which the conviction and fines obviously demonstrate that the law takes extreme exception to.

 

It is not our place to either judge or rationalise what has occurred. However it is the duty of the board and membership of the HAC to debate the issue and determine what, if any, sanction or penalty should be appropriate.

 

The credibility and value of the entire organization is at stake, as this matter will be dragged up by the opposite party every time there is a public debate.

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I seem to have inflamed some discussion on this topic with my previous post (which was removed...not by me). The purpose of my post was not to make any accusations but to disagree with the opinion of anouther poster. The amount of interest and discussion on this topic proves that the matter is of concern to people in the helicopter industry and therefore should be discussed openly.

 

One thing that I believe is missing is what the charges stemmed from....here is an article from the Globe and Mail with the said allegations before the court findings. ( as said before take all media tounge in cheek and make your own desisions)

 

"Quebec cracks down on millionaire poachers

By Ingrid Peritz

Toronto Globe and Mail — Dec. 7, 2006

(Archive)

Updated: December 7, 2006, 3:19 PM ET

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MONTREAL — The moose were stalked by helicopter and run ragged until they were dazed by noise and wind.

 

Then the beasts were picked off by millionaire gunmen as easily as plastic ducks lined up at a carnival booth.

 

Even in the pitiless world of game poaching, where deer are fatally frozen in headlights or shot for fun from pickup-truck windows, this example of poaching was as brazen as it was brutal, officials say.

 

Quebec wildlife agents are mounting cases against 19 Quebec residents after a three-year anti-poaching operation.

 

Poaching crackdowns aren't exceptional in Quebec — officials announced one this week against about 25 deer and caribou hunters in the Eastern Townships area — but the operation that allegedly unfolded around a hunting-and-fishing reserve has dismayed even seasoned wildlife agents.

 

"We're talking about wealthy people," said Renald Roy, director of the regional wildlife protection office.

 

"Most of them are millionaires. It's scandalous. They could just leave the animals alone and spend their money on a beach holiday. But their fun is killing game. It's not hunting. It's bagging a moose to impress their friends."

 

It can take a law-abiding hunter a week to track and kill a single moose.

 

The North Shore group, apparently short of time but not money, killed 10 moose in three days, officials said. Over the past three years, they bagged 30 in all.

 

The group faces charges on 70 alleged violations ranging from harassing an animal to hunting without a permit, and could pay a total of $255,000 in fines.

 

Officials seized moose meat from a series of mostly upscale homes across the province last week; agents also seized a $1.5-million helicopter from a company in the town of Alma.

 

Wildlife officials say they will release the names of the 19 after the file has been transferred to the Quebec Justice Department next month.

 

The principal shareholder of the hunting reserve says he knows nothing about the alleged poaching and wasn't there at the time.

 

"I don't hunt," said Bernard Cardinal, a physician who lives on Montreal's West Island. He said he flies his seaplane to the reserve to fish. "I'm shocked by what happened. It isn't right."

 

The shooting party had a set modus operandi, Roy said.

 

They gathered at the Lac Matonipi hunting-and-fishing outfitting lodge during the fall moose-hunting season, which begins in September. Then, one or two at a time, they headed out by helicopter to scout for moose.

 

Once one was located, the helicopter would touch down and let the shooter disembark. The helicopter then pursued the animal and, flying low, used gusts from the propeller to drive the animal toward the hunter, Roy said. The noise left the animal confused.

 

"The moose is practically hypnotized," Roy said. "It didn't stand a chance."

 

The process went on the same way for three years, officials said. But this year, wildlife officers in camouflage surreptitiously snapped photos of the operation from hideouts in the woods.

 

"For some, poaching is like a drug," said Paul Legault, a veteran wildlife protection officer and the president of the Quebec wildlife agents' union.

 

"They see game and they'll start to shake, like an alcoholic. They just have to kill the animal, and they'll just try to skirt the law to avoid getting caught."

 

Poachers are getting more sophisticated, deploying everything from night-vision glasses to global positioning systems and all-terrain vehicles. What distinguished the North Shore group was their wealth, said Legault, who was familiar with the case.

 

"We're dealing with millionaire poachers. They didn't have a lot of time, so they used a helicopter. They had the means to speed up their catch."

 

Distributed by Scripps Howard News Service. "

 

I think more disscussion is warranted (my opinion)

 

 

Cheers and Merry Christmas

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At first when I heard Mr. Jenner had been caught with some moose meat, I thought, Ok... big deal! But if he had in fact been involved with the illegal operation mentioned above, then it is my opinion that he should be removed from his current position.

I myself enjoy a good hunt to fill the freezer, but to hunt in that manner just doesn't seem right to me at all.

The saying goes innocent until proven guilty, well he was proven guilty. I just hope he wasn't involved the way the globe and mail painted the picture. :unsure:

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And here is the unabridged Globe & Mail article dated december 07, 2006:

 

[removed by moderator - you can not post articles that were obtained in the manner you obtained this one]

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bagging a moose to impress friends....LOL....you're kidding right? the swamp donkey??? impressive barely, althought they are big, which makes them easy targets.....

 

I'm only impressed when you kill something that is out to kill you at the same time....

 

swamp donkies are usually sucking back swamp vegetation and wallowing thru the forests aimlessly....I'm not impressed really....

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