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JayR

Interested In Joining The Industry

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You're taking things out of context with this. The fee guidelines published by the various provincial associations is to help engineering firms determine what to charge a client for their services. Not what the engineering firms should be compensating their employee engineers.

 

I think your guys' whole business model will have to change if you want to get to that point. Instead of working for an operator, you'll work for an AMO who doesn't have a flying operation but rather contracts their services out to the operators.

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You're taking things out of context with this. The fee guidelines published by the various provincial associations is to help engineering firms determine what to charge a client for their services. Not what the engineering firms should be compensating their employee engineers.

 

I think your guys' whole business model will have to change if you want to get to that point. Instead of working for an operator, you'll work for an AMO who doesn't have a flying operation but rather contracts their services out to the operators.

 

Huh? how would that work. How many operators are not AMO's also .

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So what advancement opportunities are there at Save On Foods for a shelf stocker? Can they 7 years from now be making around 80-90 thousand dollars per year with benifits? Would they be able to travel and work around the world as a shelf stocker? The work at Cascade for 15/hr is labourer work ,not a licensed AME. Starting AME's make between 22 and 26/hr to start. This doen't include Benifits, which after probation they are entitled to. Cascade is mostly third party maintenance which historically is on the lower end of the pay scale. Licensed experience AME's with rotary experiance can expect to make in the 100,000/year with Benifits.

 

The tone of your post shows, I think, that you are looking for a career not a job. If so, welcome to the world of aviation. You are going to find lots of nah sayers like JustAnAME, which by his moniker you can see what he thinks of his standing in the industry. I am not JustanAME, I am an an Arcraft Maintenace Engineer and I work for people who respect that. It is hard to understand how people can say there is a shortage of engineers and then whine and complain about there lot in life. If you aren't getting what you want from the employeer you are currently with, quit and move on to one that will, or maybe your just not worth it.

Totally agree 212

Is there a learning curve for stocking shelves at the local Save on? Thats what makes rotorguys wake up everyday with eyes wide open what challenges lie ahead of us? yes this industry is not for everyone but those that put up with the XXXX for a few years are renumerated

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You cannot compare Cascade to heli ops.

 

Airlines have had technicians for years. ACAs have been around for ever.

 

If you want to have regular shifts and do the union guy thing than go to cascade you will be paid similarly to any other skilled plant worker.

 

There will always bee a need for liseced guys on helis as long as there is one engineer requierd out in the bush with the machine.

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In rotary ? How many are not operators or Flt schools?

 

They are certainly more common on the fixed wing side, but I can think of a few helicopter third party AMO's, such as Avialta, Panterra, Heli Swiss, Eagle, Helitech Support Services, EM Heli Logistics, Aerosmith, Heliservices International, not to mention all the overhaul places like Acro, Heli One, Canadian Helistructures...

It is worth mention that although I started my career with a third party AMO in Northern Alberta, I prefer working for an operator. Working at the third party place we would just show up for the work and then drive to the next job, while at an operator you are a part of a whole lot more.

Helimat

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JayR, to be blunt, you will have to have some form of love affair with aviation (whether it's aviation itself, or the technical aspects) to endure the industry. Yeah, this job sometimes sucks, whether it's getting eaten alive by bugs, or freezing at -40C (plus windchill), or working long hours, etc., but you know I still love the career. You will see places and experience things that most people can only wish for. People pay thousands of dollars for a few days or weeks to experience some of things that your employer will pay you for. Yeah, you can go work mindless/repetitive, boring 9-5, unskilled labour for $25/hr to start, but they don't pay you to travel the country/world, seeing and experiencing all kinds of cool things.

 

The people who are in this or any other industry just for the money are always going to be unhappy, because somebody somewhere will be making more money for less work. There is no end to the complaints these people have. The money really isn't that bad. If you want to make 100K+ you can (as 212wrench said, without too much hassle) even on lights/intermediates. Like any line of work though (even pouring concerte) you will have to work for that 100K, and there are always sacrifices involved to make good money. But even without making those few extra sacrifices to make 100K, a quality licenced engineer can make a very decent and comfortable living.

 

JayR, with your meticulous work ethic and a good attitude, you shouldn't have any trouble making it in this industry, and having a rewarding career.

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I read that diatribe by 'JustanAME', and I have to respond.

 

You're obviously very jaded with the industry, and have some bad experiences with whoever it is you've worked for.

I must tell you, there are some great operators out there as well as what you've experienced.

 

All the operators I know personally, treat the AME with respect, as a professional, and pay a very reasonable salary, in some cases, approaching 6-figures.

 

The shortage that exists in industry today isn't unique to our industry, it exists in all sectors of the economy, but more so in the skilled trades.

 

You indicate that the AME works under 'threats and abuse'. Leave. Do not work under those conditions.

 

I have been in this industry for over 20 years now. I got into this industry because I have a passion for what I do. It's the only thing I've ever wanted to do. This reflects in my work and my attitude.

 

I can look back and reminisce about the time we were sitting on an iceberg, fishing for Arctic Char.

Or the years of working out of seismic camps, having BBQ's around the bonfire at night.

Or out in a fire camp, enjoying the comeraderie with the aircrews from all the other heli companies working on site.

 

It's all what you make of it. You can be miserable that you have to work outdoors, away from home, or whatever, or you can think of the great time you're having being out on the road. It's all up to you.

 

The money follows. If you have a passion for what you do, and try your best to do a good job, it gets noticed, and people want you working on their aircraft. The money always comes.

(In case the boss is reading, I'm waiting for the money to follow. :rolleyes: )

 

Recommend this industry to anyone? **** yeah!

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Some info on local employers:

 

Campbell Helicopter, Abbotsford BC

 

I haven’t worked here for about 13 years and at that time you wouldn’t get a job without schooling however now with the shortage now you may be able to. You would expect to spend most the winter in the hanger and the rest of the year doing 6weeks on 2 weeks off tours. They operate Bell Medium Helicopters my personal favorite type. This is a tough place to work especially long term.

 

Helilogistics, Langley BC

 

I haven’t worked in quite a long time either. The do hire without schooling at least when I worked there they did. They also paint aircraft there so you would certainly bring something to the table they could use. They maintain MD369 (500’s) and a little bit of R22. You can expect to almost never leave town with these guys. I personally enjoyed working for them quite a bit. The pay however will be lower than with a company that does tours.

 

Prism Helicopters, Pitt Medows

 

Never worked for these guys but there’s a name for you. Lots of Bush time.

 

Helijet, Richmond

 

Don’t know much about them except you don’t leave home ( I Think) and you work nights.

 

The Attributes you say you have are basically necessary for aircraft maintenance. However there is not a lot of room for “creative” repairs which you may have picked up from the automotive industry. Everything is supposed to be done to an existing standard or requires authorization from the manufacturer or Transport for deviation.

 

Another way to get school is here http://rrc.mb.ca/index.php?pid=2086 this is kind of like the block release program that exists for other trades.

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