Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JayR

Interested In Joining The Industry

Recommended Posts

Thanks for all the info guys. I've learned a lot already. It sounds to me like this trade is like many others. If you are willing to bust your ***, and work in poor conditions you can make some good money, otherwise, you get paid ok. You can make $100,000 a year if you want to spend 8 months a year in the bush where it's -40 and you sleep in a tent. Just like you can work pouring concrete in the snow at -5, busting you *** and make $100,000.

 

Here's the thing, I'm not greedy. I'd like to get paid well for being good at what I do. I have no interest flying to peace river, when it's -40 and working on a machine, even for $100,000. I want to work 40 hours a week, driving distance from my house, in a dry hanger. I'd like to make $50-$60,000 a year. I'd like to be respected, knowing I am good at what I do.

 

I need to get out of the trade I'm in right now, and here's why. ICBC pays flat rate. That means I get paid X amount of time to paint a car. ICBC also refuses to pay proper times to do so. Everywhere in North America would pay, say 3 hours to paint a fender. ICBC only pays 2 hours. So I only get paid 66% of what I should. Most painters cut corners to make the 33% back, but I can't. I have pride. I want it done once and done right. I like to feel confident that what I do is of the highest quality and my work will stand up. The problem is, people like me go broke on flat rate. You get paid less money to do a better job. Hacks make all the money.

That's why I was thinking about something like turbine engine overhauling or something like that. I'm guessing people that make sure everything is done right the first time and can stand behind their work are rewarded in the aviation trade?

 

So the question is, can I make $25-35 an hour (after I'm trained to do what I do) in a hanger, working 40 hours a week? I want my job to be a challenge. I want to be good at what I do, and I want to be able to like what I do. Most of all, I want to take pride in my work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for all the info guys. I've learned a lot already. It sounds to me like this trade is like many others. If you are willing to bust your ***, and work in poor conditions you can make some good money, otherwise, you get paid ok. You can make $100,000 a year if you want to spend 8 months a year in the bush where it's -40 and you sleep in a tent. Just like you can work pouring concrete in the snow at -5, busting you *** and make $100,000.

 

Here's the thing, I'm not greedy. I'd like to get paid well for being good at what I do. I have no interest flying to peace river, when it's -40 and working on a machine, even for $100,000. I want to work 40 hours a week, driving distance from my house, in a dry hanger. I'd like to make $50-$60,000 a year. I'd like to be respected, knowing I am good at what I do.

 

I need to get out of the trade I'm in right now, and here's why. ICBC pays flat rate. That means I get paid X amount of time to paint a car. ICBC also refuses to pay proper times to do so. Everywhere in North America would pay, say 3 hours to paint a fender. ICBC only pays 2 hours. So I only get paid 66% of what I should. Most painters cut corners to make the 33% back, but I can't. I have pride. I want it done once and done right. I like to feel confident that what I do is of the highest quality and my work will stand up. The problem is, people like me go broke on flat rate. You get paid less money to do a better job. Hacks make all the money.

 

 

That's why I was thinking about something like turbine engine overhauling or something like that. I'm guessing people that make sure everything is done right the first time and can stand behind their work are rewarded in the aviation trade?

 

So the question is, can I make $25-35 an hour (after I'm trained to do what I do) in a hanger, working 40 hours a week? I want my job to be a challenge. I want to be good at what I do, and I want to be able to like what I do. Most of all, I want to take pride in my work.

 

 

everybody in this industry does do deligence. Theres no **** ups allowed mistakes are made up theres checks in place to mininize those. You can never compare automotive to aviation maint. The deal you make never clouds your vision on an aircraft theres a huge difference between the two industries. And you will be in butt **** nowhere and crying to go home. If I was you I would seriously consider what you are getting into , we would all love to find a stay at home job that pays 100K let me know who to call cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't say I wanted a stay at home $100,000 a year job. I said I'd rather a stay at home job for $50,000 than take a job that pays $100,000 and puts you in somewhere it's -40. And I want a job where screw ups are not tolerated. I'm tired of doing top quality work, when the guy beside me does terrible work and gets paid more because he gets it done faster.

 

A friend of mine, who is an AME aswell as a pilot, knew I was looking for a new career. He knows me very well, and knows I'm picky. I can't just say "good enough" I need perfection. That's why he pointed me in this direction. I think AMEs are a different type of people. Sure some just work for a huge company like Air Canada, and get paid to sit on their *****, and are lazy. But the ones working for smaller companies, are very smart, maticulous, and have a real passion for their jobs and aircraft. I think I might be one of those people. Not that I have a huge interest in aircraft, but I have a huge interest in how things work, and doing good work.

 

Again, thanks for any input! Even negative input is good, because I need to know what I am up against.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jay R, take everything you read with a grain of salt. Justanengineer's post is full of factual errors it's pathetic. If being an engineer is that bad, why is he still in the business?? Why isn't he stocking shelves at the Superstore?? Or pouring concrete on a construction job?? There are people with poisonous attitudes in all works of life.

 

Lunchbox took the words right out of my mouth. I've doing this for almost twenty years and it's the best thing I could've ever done.

One thing I would advise, look for something in the overhaul or refurbishing sector. That's the only way you'll be able to have regular hours and be home every night. Another suggestion would be to sacrifice the next 5 years of your life, get your AME ticket, spend a couple years in the field just to gain some field experience that I think will be very valuable although not necessary in your overhaul career.

 

Either way, good luck in your quest!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some info on local employers:

 

Campbell Helicopter, Abbotsford BC

 

I haven’t worked here for about 13 years and at that time you wouldn’t get a job without schooling however now with the shortage now you may be able to. You would expect to spend most the winter in the hanger and the rest of the year doing 6weeks on 2 weeks off tours. They operate Bell Medium Helicopters my personal favorite type. This is a tough place to work especially long term.

 

How wrong you are z1milhouse about Campbell Helicopters!! Campbell is an excellent company to work for. I have been doing contract work for Campbell off and on for several years now. I have worked for several companys including Canadian and I would pick Campbell over all the rest in a heartbeat! Excellent pay, excellent rotation, and excellent field support and a Christmas party second to none. Bruce Campbell is not running a "hanger social club" (like many operators), all he wants is for you to give 8 hours work for 8 hours pay (I know, it's a shocking concept for some people) I don't know what the rotation is for permanent staff, but the contractors can pretty well choose what they want.

I would respectfully suggest that in the future if you make statements about ANY company, you should ensure you are current in your facts. eg. be employed by them when you are making your statements.

Have a good day!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You might not like to hear this, but I would recommend you stick to automotive work.

While you might think that it is better "on the other side of the fence", the aviation world as seen from an AME point of view is not something that should be recommended to anyone.

While we have come a long way through the years and developped thick skins, AME's are still the most abused people in the industry. For one, there are corporate sponsored societies like CAMC trying to take control of licensing away from Transport Canada. Basically this will mean that your license would be under the hands of business. My goodness!, a regulatory body who's sole aim should only be the safety of the industry should be in charge. Currently however, Transport Canada appears to be more interested in making money through fines rather than physically ensuring that aircrafts are safe. Books don't fly, aircrafts do! The common excuse used is that they have no money to enforce anything. Given the fact that there are so many unscrupulous operators in this business, guess who is lining up to take control of licensing? As the AME shortage increases every year, there are continuous attempts made to try and fix the problem by trying to circumvent the need for AME's. One novel idea is having just one AME per AMO working with a bunch of CAMC approved Technicians. The intent is to save money by having only one "expensive" but usually overworked and in reality underpaid AME sign for all the work carried out in the business, while hiring low wage earners like CAMC trained technicians to help him or her do the work.

Starting at 15 dollars an hour at Cascade, you can do better by going to Save On Foods stocking shelves for 17 dollars per hour.

To be sure, it won't be as interesting, but you'll get to pay your bills, and more importantly you will have time to think about a real career, not something where you will live a lifetime enduring threats and abuse.

Given the incredible responsibilities AME's hold and experience on a daily basis, they really aren't recognized as professionals nor are they paid accordingly. This is why there is a shortage, surprise, surprise. Why would you want to work in an industry that will do nothing to support you? Remember the current regulatory body, Transport Canada, it's more interested in fining you for one thing or another, and no aviation related association will stand by you to establish professional standards to ensure AME's are treated fairly. Engineers are professionals, but they are not recognized as such by their own employers. So called "Professional Engineers" on the other hand have an association with established guidelines indicating what wages P-Eng types will accept depending on their years of qualification. There is nothing for the Aircraft Maintenance Engineer in place despite the existence of associations for decades. Everyone has ideas on how things should be run, but no one agrees on anything. Since AME's are used to troubleshooting everything by themselves, they never speak up. AME's are their own worst ennemies and operators are standing by to abuse them, EVEN WHEN THERE IS A SHORTAGE like now. So, what are you going to do?

Please reconsider for your own sake before you end up disappointed like the rest of us old timers.

It just isn't worth the grief.

 

While I agree with most on this thread. I think "justanAME" has a few valid points. I have taken the liberty of highlighting the points I think are valid. It is obvious that he is sick and tired of waking up sick and tired, as we all are sometimes especially when you get a bit older but you suck it up buttercup and keep on trucking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi,

I have spent the whole week-end at work, dismantling and re-building a helicopter engine, installing it back into the airframe. I was alone, in a warm, bug-free, well lighted hangar, doing maintenance on a clean, nice machine. Good music was playing on the radio and I think I was happy to be there.

I could have been full of grief and hate, spending yet another week-end out of home. But even if I would have preferred staying with my family, I tried to look at the nice side of things: working inside, for once, was a good feeling. If I had never worked before in more unfriendly environments (-30, or bugs, or rain, or night, or whatever), maybe I wouldn’t have found today that I was such a lucky guy !

Seriously, justanAME, do yourself a favour and quit ! You may not be happy in another trade, whatever it is, but staying in the aircraft maintenance business with your state of mind could prove risky for you and people working with you, not to speak about passengers. Haven’t you heard about human factors ?

Each person has the choice. Nobody was sentenced to aircraft maintenance for life. If you did a mistake, admit it and go for a change.

OK, some bosses may consider you more as a slave than as an engineer. But don’t say that they all do. There are some good guys and good companies in the industry. And be sure that by this time of the year, they all look for good engineers. OK, we have hard times, stress and a big responsibility. But it’s for this reason we are proud of what we achieve.

Today, when the helicopter came back from its first commercial flight after maintenance, MY engine running smoothly, passengers smiling, pilot smiling, yes, after more than 20 years doing maintenance, I felt great. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

I have spent the whole week-end at work, dismantling and re-building a helicopter engine, installing it back into the airframe. I was alone, in a warm, bug-free, well lighted hangar, doing maintenance on a clean, nice machine. Good music was playing on the radio and I think I was happy to be there.

I could have been full of grief and hate, spending yet another week-end out of home. But even if I would have preferred staying with my family, I tried to look at the nice side of things: working inside, for once, was a good feeling. If I had never worked before in more unfriendly environments (-30, or bugs, or rain, or night, or whatever), maybe I wouldn’t have found today that I was such a lucky guy !

Seriously, justanAME, do yourself a favour and quit ! You may not be happy in another trade, whatever it is, but staying in the aircraft maintenance business with your state of mind could prove risky for you and people working with you, not to speak about passengers. Haven’t you heard about human factors ?

Each person has the choice. Nobody was sentenced to aircraft maintenance for life. If you did a mistake, admit it and go for a change.

OK, some bosses may consider you more as a slave than as an engineer. But don’t say that they all do. There are some good guys and good companies in the industry. And be sure that by this time of the year, they all look for good engineers. OK, we have hard times, stress and a big responsibility. But it’s for this reason we are proud of what we achieve.

Today, when the helicopter came back from its first commercial flight after maintenance, MY engine running smoothly, passengers smiling, pilot smiling, yes, after more than 20 years doing maintenance, I felt great. :rolleyes:

 

Very well put CIEH, You have just put it in a way all us "Lifers" have thought for years!! I hope to meet you one day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very well put CIEH, You have just put it in a way all us "Lifers" have thought for years!! I hope to meet you one day.

Say it could be at Heli-Expo 2009 !!!

They seem to have a lot of fun over there. Next year, I promise, I'll be part of it....

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...