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Kyle

'stuck Pedal' Caused Tense Moments

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Okay... now I'm really confused. Which way do the blades turn on an Enstrom anyway? :wacko:

 

 

i'd have to say counter clockwise, as the first video shows the machine shut down and you can see the trailing edge of the main rotors.

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These comments and confusion over stuck pedals, which pedal is stuck, how much is it stuck, which way are the blades turning on this ship etc etc just reinforce the thoughts of the instructors I mentioned earlier.......

"......they simply got the helicopter to the landing site, then cut the throttle......"

 

It seems to have some merit, huh??

Try it next time you are flying with someone you can blame it on if it all goes awry!!!

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at least he got it down, walked away, didn't bend anything...

 

 

Yeah, but what does that matter if he didn't do it "the right way???" :lol: :lol:

 

Just kidding (before all the fingers start moving!!), if I do it half that good if the time comes I'll be more than happy... :up: :up:

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Ya know reading all this makes me confused as well. Will input my own rules of thumb:

 

In a helicopter that requires you to push left pedal to counter torque(take off) and the pedals get stuck, use left crab on approach for ALL jammed pedals. Deal with it at the bottom accordingly, ie slow high powered approach beeping down or rollling a bit of throttle off for left jam OR steep approach slight flare cushion roll off throttle for right jam. BUT the nose should ALWAYS be to the left on the approach.(My old friend Evan would disagree as he always did 40 kts nose straight till flare and roll throttle, but each to their own)

 

In a helicopter that requires you to push right pedal to counter toque and the pedals are jammed use right crab, and same as above except can't beep astar for right jam, use power, and crosscontrol the aircraft(left cyclic to counter right rotation) works pretty well. Gots lots of time instructing in these beasts and never had to do 50 kt run on, would think about autorotating if that bad of a jam, would rather roll over doing 0 then banging around some stump farm at 50.

 

Had many an instructor and candidate try to reach the grey matter in my head about where the wind should be on the approach, best I can say is try to have have the wind out front and the nose crabbing according to track, works the simplest.

 

And Thank you to Mr Al Mackay for the 40 kts and 40% q rule, most all helicopters will fly with any type of jam at those numbers,,odd but is kinda accurate.

 

And read the flight manual, is pretty good in Astar(or sorry Ecuriel).

 

Far as the guy doing it wrong, looks like he got it down, thus the equal landings to takeoffs rule make it all okeydokey.

 

Have been in jetranger when a pilot thought that chopping the throttle for left jam would be the right thing(he told about it first and was ready) and you know it worked out great but man did it snap initially, so is always another way to skin a cat.

paul

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AHA! NOW'S MY CHANCE! Here's where we can all start revising the muddy "stuck pedal" terminology--because it's never clearly stated whether that stuck pedal is stuck FORWARD or AFT!

 

Let's start calling the asymmetry "excess tail rotor thrust" or (the opposite) "inadequate tail rotor thrust." Or some kind of CLEAR description like that. "Stuck pedal," as a training title, merely leaves the poor student (and all too often, the poor CFI!) scratching their heads for the next two weeks wondering WHERE that pedal was stuck--forward or aft. Or even in between. Not good terminology.

 

If we can go to all the pain and agony of eradicating "settling with power" from the traditional vocabulary, we might as go on cleaning up our act and get rid of "stuck pedal."

 

What new terminology do you favor?

 

[And after that, we can beat on the FAA and innumerable instructors to abandon the use of "coriolis effect" or "coriolis force" as a WRONG explanation for coning-vs-rpm variations, that's ALL caused by conservation of angular momentum and is NOT coriolis effect. Ask any competent physicist.]

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Stuck forward or aft?

 

It always helps to explain a jammed pedal in two manners ie: too much left might mean not enough right pedal but have only heard that particual problem called jammed left pedal.

 

As far as the position, it can be a moot point for instance a neutral pedal position jam will probably require a similar approach as for right jam so do the fact finding and see what is required. Have seen many jetranger pilots who would not believe they hold right pedal forward in hover till we get back to base and have to hover with 15 kt crosswind from left then get them to look at their feet.

 

I prefer to call a jammed pedal in hover as "left rotation" "no rotation" or "right rotation" and carry on accordingly. Inflight is decribed as left jam/neutral/right jammed just to begin the fault and fact finding. Never in 27 + years heard anyone call a jammed pedal aft....is there a reason for it?

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The way I look at it is, the pedal is stuck at higher or lower them hover power, and that changes from flight to flight.

 

stuck at 95% and you where hovering at 90% = stuck left

stuck at 95% and you where hovering at 100% = stuck right

 

Jeff

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