Jump to content

2014 Season - Need For Foreign Pilots?


Recommended Posts

USL Toad

 

You may want to check your facts, Licencing apart the EU is closed to Canadians and the skill pilot is not on the official list for ease of entry . My hunch is that its duel citizens. Apart from the 12 exams the EU is even out of reach for me with over 1500 multi On the big Sikorsky even if I had a 139 rating not going to happen . Closed shop... So as350's and 206's hmmm not sure about that..

 

P5

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I call B.S on most of what you said. I don't have a JAA but I travel to Europe often and it is way harder to break in the industry there than it is here. As for Canadian pilots (especially low time ones) working there ,you are even more full of it.

He's pissing up a rope with his argument. If there are any low time guys flying there its because they have a birthright lineage. So many lame arguments trying to deflect on facts!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pilot5.

 

I'm not looking to stir the pot but your assumption on :the vast majority of Canadians being overseas are high time multi-engine IFR pilots" is incorrect.

 

I have no doubt there are many Canadians that fit in to the skill level you speak of and work IFR, however I do not move in the IFR circles, I am talking about VFR Canadian pilots. As I say, our company had 2 last season and 1 still remains. I know of NUMEROUS Cannucks flying around Europe, and plenty of low-time ones. Perhaps its easier to get a break in Europe early on and that is what attracts them - the flying certainly isn't as fun, granted its warmer in the winter.

 

One of the said pilots doesn't even have a TC CPL, only a JAR one. He knows he can easily convert it if he decides to go home - and why not. Sadly it is not as easy for TC or FAA to convert to EASA licenses, it should be.

 

Again, not looking for a debate, I am talking first hand experience of working with Canadians in Europe. Let me ask you, have you and are you licensed to fly in Europe? Because with all due respect, unless you are, you have absolutely no idea of the industry here and who is working where. I mean that sincerely, if you haven't and don't, its like me saying I know where every European pilot around the world works!

 

It is not just Canada that has foreign pilots, and there are many, many Canadians that have aspirations to work in Europe and elsewhere in the world and I say go for it. You live once, this isn't a rehearsal, and if our licenses which we should all feel privileged to have allow us to see the world then what a great position we are all in.

 

Safe flying.

 

P.S the world is bigger than Canada - go explore it and enjoy it.

 

Pilot5.

 

I'm not looking to stir the pot but your assumption on :the vast majority of Canadians being overseas are high time multi-engine IFR pilots" is incorrect.

 

I have no doubt there are many Canadians that fit in to the skill level you speak of and work IFR, however I do not move in the IFR circles, I am talking about VFR Canadian pilots. As I say, our company had 2 last season and 1 still remains. I know of NUMEROUS Cannucks flying around Europe, and plenty of low-time ones. Perhaps its easier to get a break in Europe early on and that is what attracts them - the flying certainly isn't as fun, granted its warmer in the winter.

 

One of the said pilots doesn't even have a TC CPL, only a JAR one. He knows he can easily convert it if he decides to go home - and why not. Sadly it is not as easy for TC or FAA to convert to EASA licenses, it should be.

 

Again, not looking for a debate, I am talking first hand experience of working with Canadians in Europe. Let me ask you, have you and are you licensed to fly in Europe? Because with all due respect, unless you are, you have absolutely no idea of the industry here and who is working where. I mean that sincerely, if you haven't and don't, its like me saying I know where every European pilot around the world works!

 

It is not just Canada that has foreign pilots, and there are many, many Canadians that have aspirations to work in Europe and elsewhere in the world and I say go for it. You live once, this isn't a rehearsal, and if our licenses which we should all feel privileged to have allow us to see the world then what a great position we are all in.

 

Safe flying.

 

P.S the world is bigger than Canada - go explore it and enjoy it.

 

Pilot5.

 

I'm not looking to stir the pot but your assumption on :the vast majority of Canadians being overseas are high time multi-engine IFR pilots" is incorrect.

 

I have no doubt there are many Canadians that fit in to the skill level you speak of and work IFR, however I do not move in the IFR circles, I am talking about VFR Canadian pilots. As I say, our company had 2 last season and 1 still remains. I know of NUMEROUS Cannucks flying around Europe, and plenty of low-time ones. Perhaps its easier to get a break in Europe early on and that is what attracts them - the flying certainly isn't as fun, granted its warmer in the winter.

 

One of the said pilots doesn't even have a TC CPL, only a JAR one. He knows he can easily convert it if he decides to go home - and why not. Sadly it is not as easy for TC or FAA to convert to EASA licenses, it should be.

 

Again, not looking for a debate, I am talking first hand experience of working with Canadians in Europe. Let me ask you, have you and are you licensed to fly in Europe? Because with all due respect, unless you are, you have absolutely no idea of the industry here and who is working where. I mean that sincerely, if you haven't and don't, its like me saying I know where every European pilot around the world works!

 

It is not just Canada that has foreign pilots, and there are many, many Canadians that have aspirations to work in Europe and elsewhere in the world and I say go for it. You live once, this isn't a rehearsal, and if our licenses which we should all feel privileged to have allow us to see the world then what a great position we are all in.

 

Safe flying.

 

P.S the world is bigger than Canada - go explore it and enjoy it.

So I'm to assume that falling off the turnip wagon is a common thing in your world?!?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone working in Europe likely has dual citizenship, or there may be a way in through the UK (Canadians are allowed to vote in the UK, at least). The EASA ATPL(H) currently requires 14 exams, and the CPL(H) 13.

 

The only job market that is lively in the UK is the North Sea - there is no bush work except in Scotland. The charter stuff won't really start for a month or so. Ireland is dead, as is Italy.

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not going to get in to childish arguments, especially being called a liar and talking BS. For what gain would that be?

 

I don't know what visa's they hold or how they are here. Same for the Aussie's and Kiwi's but again - if you were here you would see it for yourself, they are here. One thing to note is that if the school has Tier 4 Trusted Sponsor Status they can take on their students, this could be the avenue with the lower time pilots. Some helicopter schools in the UK do hold this. At no point did I say its easier to get a start in Europe, I said perhaps its easier and thats what attracts them - I'm guessing as to why they want to be here.

 

Phil, as you talk of Scotland, you are talking about a certain three lettered operator and as I'm sure you know, they do have at least one Canadian pilot on their books. All pilots there are VFR only and the primary machine is the AS350, plenty of AS355's to boot too. They are pretty busy in Ireland - thats just one operator though, I don't know the general state of affairs in Ireland currently though. I doubt they have recovered from the recession that hit them so hard. Certainly not the Ireland it was for helicopters in the early 2000's.

 

Why it is so hard to believe Canadians work in Europe is beyond me… If you wish to continue personal insults on me I will happily step out of the thread and watch you being bitter amongst yourselves and refuse to listen to people first hand - exactly what you are trying to put across when you talk about foreign pilots in your lands.

 

Again, I have no bone to pick with anyone and not looking to rattle a hornets nest, I merely thought my input from first hand experience would have been welcomed in a general discussion.

 

Regards to all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

USL - PDG don't pay much and I know that they have foreigners there for that very reason - one of my students (a Kiwi) is there at the moment, and he hasn't finished his EASA exams yet (on his last 2), so I can only conclude that he has a validation, which is even more strange because EASA very much frown upon them. I believe his wife is British, though.

 

Several companies have had their AOCs pulled after Barnesey's crash, so the job market in UK is drying up even further. However, people are buying 429s, and those who need their special twin conversion are increasing, so somebody's buying twins in the corporate world. That's where the work is, in the twin/IR field, whether corporate or otherwise.

 

As for Canadians - had one in my classroom last week :)

 

phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

USL Toad

 

1. There were a few comments that may seemed childish, but please remember that there is a huge frustration here in Canada about the lack of Jobs for Canadians , mix a bunch of foreign pilots in and its a hot topic.

 

2. The problem lies with the Canadian immigration service and the supposed Bilateral agreements. The Data that HRDC uses is not representative of the actual facts. Combine this with The industry that is driven by insurance requirements and client understanding of what is safe and what is not. This make for a very hard go for youn fellas and gals trying to break in....HAC could change this but their interest are not with assisting Canadain citizens find jobs but more with protecting domestic business interests, so any suggestion the HAC will go the mile for young Canadians find work is extant and anyboy who believe otherwise is living in a world of incredulous wilfull blindness.

 

3. EU, Brazil, Austraila, Newzealand, there governments protect jobs on the front line, sure there are Canadian companies that work there but this doesn't help a low time pilot over the age of 31 on on a 2 year stint. So if your 32 no chance without 1000's of hrs.

 

4. Africa , PNG and a few other very small countries with limited Market size are still viable options, but also far and few between if you have a Canadian license and a few hundred hrs.

 

5 Even with ATPL and thousands of hrs Multi , Austrailia , EU, UK is still a closed shop even if you work for a large multinational and its almost impossible to transfer within.

 

6. Africa, Middle East - is pretty well closed to Canadians unless you have a IFR and a ATPL and an existing comparable type. Like bell 205 you could they qualify for cojo with ADA on a 212. But what low timer has 205 time?

 

That being said probably better just to leave the subject alone and find positive ways to help young Canadian pilots hook up here in Canada. I did notice that recently some companies are hiring like Yellow Head and sure Highland and others will send out an advert too soon . When you have no time and no experience don't expect a whole lot. It hasn't changed since my day and the struggle to 1500 hrs was years of eating #### and working very hard. But today as I cruise out over the open ocean in a glass cockpit twin, i look back with fondness of the struggle and in a sort of sick way l. Ah bugs and rolling drums!!!! Keeps ya fit. Fire bosses difficult over- demanding clients etc.

 

I am always open to PMs and emails from newbies and will try to help where i can, but best suggestion is to work out of aviation if you cannot find a seat , earn cash improve your qualifications IFR / Night etc. Dont expect too much too fast, when you are young meaning under 30 it hard to convince the owner to cut you loose with 2 million dollars worth of his assets. Time and persistence always wins the day! Patience!

 

Best to all newbies. Hold in there!!

 

P5

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

One of the things companies could do is stop the ridiculous business of having qualified guys behind an ops desk for 2 years while they "assess their character". Northern Mountain did that, and even when I was there for just a few months, there were 76 hours I did that could have been done by a low timer under supervision.

 

Phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...