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Monitoring 123.2 On The Coast


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Hey ladies and gents

 

On a PPC ride in the past I was asked a question about monitoring 123.2 low level VFR on the coast as opposed to 126.7 and the transport dude pointed it out in the CFS.

 

Have been looking now a few years later and am trying to find it again.

Any help would be appreciated with a cold beverage of your choice if you happen to be passing through Squamish!

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This part I have

 

Quote:

CHANGE IN NOTAM PROCEDURE REGARDING LOGGING ACTIVITIES PACIFIC REGION

Transport Canada, Pacific Region has been working with the logging industry to develop an improved safe method to provide protection for aircraft in the vicinity of blasting areas. This past summer, an agreement was reached that will greatly reduce the number of NOTAMs issued, and more importantly, reduce the hazard to aviation.

The new procedures have been in effect (by NOTAM) since July 2004, and rely on the cooperation of both pilots and the logging crews.

Blasters' Responsibilities (NOTAM will not be filed):

• If utilizing instantaneous blasting equipment, blasters will ensure the area is clear of all air traffic prior to the blast.

• If utilizing a standard 6 min fuse, blasters will make two transmissions on 123.2 MHz, advising of the imminent blast. These transmissions will be at approximately 4 min and 1 min prior to the estimated blast. These transmissions will include the geographical location, referenced to a prominent landmark, and the time to the blast.

• Notwithstanding the above two calls, if blasters detect an aircraft in the immediate vicinity of a blast, they will direct a radio transmission to that aircraft, using aircraft type and colour (i.e. red and white helicopter, you are over an active blast site, clear the area immediately).

• Blasters may elect to utilize both methods for added safety.

Pilots’ Responsibilities:

When operating VFR over forested areas of British Columbia, pilots should:

• Be aware of new logging road construction, new construction areas at beach level (areas used for log sorting), and rock drilling equipment; if there is no dust or activity in the vicinity, then a blast could be imminent.

• Arrange flight to be at least 1 000 ft AGL in areas of active road construction or logging.

• Monitor 123.2 MHz for imminent blasting notification if operating below 1 000 ft AGL.

• Determine their location in reference to the blast site upon hearing a warning transmission regarding an imminent blast, and if necessary either climb to at least 1 000 ft AGL, or deviate from the blast area.

• Contact the blast site and advise them of the aircraft's location and intentions if unable to comply with the above recommendations.

• Relay information on active blast sites to other pilots in the area.

Note:

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Hey ladies and gents

 

On a PPC ride in the past I was asked a question about monitoring 123.2 low level VFR on the coast as opposed to 126.7 and the transport dude pointed it out in the CFS.

 

Have been looking now a few years later and am trying to find it again.

Any help would be appreciated with a cold beverage of your choice if you happen to be passing through Squamish!

The only reason that you should be monitoring 123.2 instead of 126.7 is flying in the vicinity of an uncontrolled aerodrome without a published ATF as per CFS (A86 General).But again,that does not apply only to the coast...Back to my tree.

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The only reason that you should be monitoring 123.2 instead of 126.7 is flying in the vicinity of an uncontrolled aerodrome without a published ATF as per CFS (A86 General).But again,that does not apply only to the coast...Back to my tree.

 

 

Ok.

 

Try it and see how many floaters and helis you talk to in the course of a day around here. 123.2 is used because we all take off and land all over the place, all the time - there is method to the madness.

 

AR

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The only place I've ever seen it published is in the CFS for when you are flying around the QCI's.

Windslapper, was that you that got an earfull from the birddog the other day for being on 123.2 instead of 126.7?

 

 

Yes it was, bleeding from the ears I was

 

That said I was on a frequency I was instructed to be. My forestry crew on board were not impressed with the man but they are sorting that out internally.

 

My job is to keep me and my crew safe in the air and that becomes difficult when communications are compromised. as AR pointed out, If I approached any of the areas monitoring only 126.7 I would have an awfully quiet radio but a really good close-up of a lot of aircraft.

 

Just to clarify, we were first response to this fire and told no other aircraft were in the area.

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as a footnote

The protocols set out in forestry are quite clear on the use of 126.7 for fires and the airspace around them. I guess my question is why we would monitor this low level when no one else is.

 

The error I made is that when I could not get a reply on the repeater I should have then gone to vhf 126.7

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