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I will take a look at "Great Lakes Helicopters". Why do you suggest them, do you work or have you trained with them?

 

I spent the majority of my flight training with their head instructor, Nick Booth. I was impressed with his teaching techniques and I learned alot.

 

Vast

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Helifly - if you were at that Oshawa show, you would have boought the book from me directly!

 

I wouldn't worry too much about WHIMIS or Dangerous Goods or even First Aid, as your first company will have do that for you anyway, although DG is in the syllabus for the exams (BTW, a whole course is now in my books). Sometimes, they can accept other folks' training and certificates, but not always. I wouldn't use it as a decider as to whether to go to a school or not, but if they throw it in - hey, go for it!

 

I hear you about getting best bang for buck for your flying hour - maybe you would also want to take a look at Silverline's flyit simulator - although not the best sim on the market, it is accurate enough for you to get a feel for the (206) machine at a much cheaper rate, and will certainly give you the chance to get the best out of every minute in the air. I don't know whether they have robbies or not, but it is true that the 300 is not so popular as a working helicopter, which is a shame as it is a good machine. But that's life!

 

Feel free to PM me if you have any questions - TC are one of my customers, and they regularly send me stuff they think might be useful!

 

As you have three years to study, that advice about not buying books looks even more silly - let me give you a quote from Nick Lappos, who is a well-known helicopter personality:

 

“Pure book knowledge should be impeccable - every second of doubt about "what do I do now?" is worth 30% of workload. Mostly because the self-doubt and second-guessing are real time and mental capacity wasters. The more you know flat cold, the easier it is to fly under the gauges”

 

phil

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Good quote, and true. I guess I thought he was starting his training in the summer....but yea 3 years, go for it, start reading!! The Oshawa Airshow in 2005? I was there, I must have missed you in the sea of fixed wing stuff. I just saw the best airshow of my live here on the weekend in Florida!!!! Blackhawks, apache's, the thunderbirds, etc. :punk: :punk: :punk:

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Good quote, and true. I guess I thought he was starting his training in the summer....but yea 3 years, go for it, start reading!! The Oshawa Airshow in 2005? I was there, I must have missed you in the sea of fixed wing stuff. I just saw the best airshow of my live here on the weekend in Florida!!!! Blackhawks, apache's, the thunderbirds, etc. :punk: :punk: :punk:

 

 

That does sound like quite the airshow! I wish there were more helicopter airshows around where I live. Fixed wing just isn't exciting enough. (No offense to anyone)

 

Phil,

 

Sent you a PM.

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A good foundation with a solid understanding of core concepts and principles is the basis for learning whether it be academics or learning a new skill. So as far as not reading ahead and not giving yourself that foundation to build upon at flight school, I think that's BS. You have to know what study though. Reading the CARS and memorizing sections is probably futile where as learning the principles of flight and meteorology will probably be beneficial. I've found a background in math and physics has been helpful in my understanding of flight so you might want to bring that knowledge up to speed if it's not already. If it is, be prepared to see a lot of weird #### in the diagrams of these books (like vectors with no direction).

 

Most schools I've talked to use From the Ground Up as part of their curriculum. I'm reading it right now and it's very well written, much better than all the helicopter books I've read, probably since it's as old as dirt and gone through several editions. You can get it from most public libraries.

 

The Art and Science of Flying Helicopters along with Pitch and Collective by Shawn Coyle are good books specific to helicopters. Some of the material is a bit advanced and geared more towards operational pilots but I think it's still good to know and be aware about these topics, even as someone new to the subject. I got these from my local public library as well.

 

A lot of people like Phil Croucher's Professional Helicopter Pilot Studies. I got it recently and read a few chapters and was somewhat disappointed. It might be because I'm used to reading well structured and defined academic textbooks. I'll give it another go after I finish From the Ground Up.

 

As for what helicopter you train on, I agree with Cole. 100 hours is 100 hours. That's what most of the operators I've spoken to have told me as well.

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xrkyle,

 

I agree. Learning ahead and understanding it makes much more sense. As long as you don't misunderstand something cause that could really screw you up.

 

As for what helicopter you train on, I agree with Cole. 100 hours is 100 hours. That's what most of the operators I've spoken to have told me as well.

I agree, however to train on the R22/44 would make a little more sense if that's what I'll be flying. Plus it will make it much easier.

 

I'll be definetly buying a few books to learn from. As I said I have 3 years so that's plenty of time!

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