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flying.eth

Time Building/instruction

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You are reading too much into what was written...

 

What was stated was that a Transport Canada licensed pilot could NOT be able to log the hours in your FAA machine, and in Canada only ONE PIC in the aircraft (ofcourse if you are flying a US reg machine, and have two FAA licensed pilots and one is a CFI, you can do as you please, but the regs are different.

 

Also I think what was meant by Rob here (who is himself an accomplished instructor) is that the VALUE of flying with someone who are barely away from school, in a very demanding area is probably not the greatest idea around. Sorta like getting your buddy to teach you longlining, when he's got 15 more hours than you do...

 

Anyways, poor idea.

 

Cheers

H

(Also an instructor who has never flown in the mountains, and won't pretend that I have the experience to)

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Jon,

 

Please please please get some rotary mtn training before you take people out. It's a big mistake to underestimate the complexity of mountain winds and remote landings. Whatever your FW experience, it hasn't prepared you for landing on a ridge, in a saddle, on a peak, or in a cirque. Not to mention taking off again.

 

D. Mitten

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Jon

You would do very well to pay close attention to the last two posts. Attempting to provide instruction in the mountains there with 300 hours is a fools game that has huge risk involved. Flying mountains fixed wing doesn't provide much useful skills to your rotary side. I've got lots of time in both. Fly how you will, but don't take some unsuspecting low timer down the garden path.

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.

As far as mountain flying, are US pilots automatically inferior to Canadian pilots? While I only have a little over 300 hrs. helicopter and I know the mountains are Pemberton are serious (I did some flying there last year in the same helicopter). That being said we have some pretty serious mountains up here in AK and I spend nearly everyday in them (fixed wing) often landing off-airport where being able to read the wind and conditions is as critical as it is in a helicopter, sometimes more so as many days landing there would be impossible. Knowing how to read the winds and conditions is the one of the most important parts of mountain flying in my opinion.

 

Thanks,

Jon

.

 

the fact that you're trying to compare flying a fixed wing aircraft with a rotor wing in a mountain environment shows how little you understand the complexities of flying helicopters in this environment. when was the last time you flew into a cirque in a plane? how about landing on a Saddle? Pinnacle? and in an R22? give your head a shake. having spent most of my 400hrs of Robbie time in Mountains, and none of it in the Southern BC stuff, (way out of my experience level) I think you need to take a mountain course in one before you try to teach in the mountains in one. I sure as **** would.

 

as for canadian vs yankee pilots and their level of training fresh out of flight school... I happen to be a graduate of schools on both sides of the border and well.. I'll just stop typing now ;)

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Is this thread for real? Instructing in mountains in a R22, with 300 hrs is absolutly insane.

 

Not to long ago there was another hot thread about US training in Canada......

 

I hope you don't get bent, and I hope you don't bend someone else.

 

 

bad idea

 

 

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I'm a U.S. citizen, and I did my primary training and worked as a flight instructor in the United States. I do believe that there are plenty of basic maneuvers that a low-time but competent and focused instructor can teach perfectly well.

 

That said, most of my friends know how strongly I feel about the general state of mountain flying training in the United States — it's pretty inadequate. I was a newly certified flight instructor when I paid my first visit to the Canadian Helicopters mountain flying school in Penticton, and it blew my mind to realize that almost everything I had been taught about flying in the mountains was wrong. Mountain flying is definitely something other than a "basic maneuver."

 

Even a few hours of specialized mountain training with an experienced instructor can be invaluable in identifying exactly what's hazardous about landing a helicopter in mountainous terrain — and what you can and cannot do safely at your particular experience level. Canadian Helicopters obviously has a great course, and there are plenty of experienced mountain pilots in B.C. to learn from. If you're looking for training in the U.S., I'm pretty enthusiastic about the mountain flying program at Homestead Helicopters in Missoula, Montana, which I visited in May.

 

Always happy to discuss this further — PM me if you'd like any details.

 

Cheers,

 

Elan

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I did my course @ 2500hrs and it was very humbling. Maybe KO had something to do with that... :)

 

Dick

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I did mine at 3500 in a 44 with a Crazy Frenchman. Landed at 10500 on a table top on the leeward side of the Rockies....that was the easy part! Piece of advise if I may. Take your 22 and hire an EXPERIENCED mountain instructor. You supply the machine and fuel and then pay for the instructing. If you can find a guy to do it I guarantee your eyes will just as wide as mine were when we powered out at 30 kts facing a rock wall in a cirque with nowhere to go but backwards. I thanked him and my company every time I hit the hills after that....it paid in spades.

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