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Flying In The Arctic


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Interesting for sure. Is that near sea level? Usually you wouldn't have open water at those temps, but I have seen some this year in tidal water when the ice is shifting.

 

I am interested to see what the coldest temperature that anyone has picked up ice in cloud (at altitude), enough to be a major concern?

 

 

Yes I am at sea level. The water is frozen everywhere here now. (within a couple hundred miles anyway). There are a few cracks in the ice but its pretty much hard pack now.

 

I don't have an answer for your second question. Its good though, I hope someone answers.

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When I was young and stupid VS old and stupid a very wise man told me "Make sure you and your passengers are dressed to stand around for 24 hrs wearing just what they have on! The survival equipment might burn/sink with the machine."

I have had folks get off an exec jet wearing Toronto top coat ( Very fashionable ) NO hats or gloves, street shoes with rubber covers and a suit READY to fly 200 miles to a camp at -25C with a refuel enroute! Refused to fly them. The " big big execs " called the company ( with my help )the ops manager told them to go to a store ( thankfully available )and buy the needed clothes, boots ect. They did it with good grace and they learned the error at the refueling stop - just 30 minutes even in "full kit" was enough for them. They thanked me after the 4 days we spent together. Some folks just don't know.

You have to take care of folks like this.

I wouldn't survive 2 hrs on the Toronto stock exchange and they wouldn't survive 2 hrs in clothes like that.

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When I was young and stupid VS old and stupid a very wise man told me "Make sure you and your passengers are dressed to stand around for 24 hrs wearing just what they have on! The survival equipment might burn/sink with the machine."

I have had folks get off an exec jet wearing Toronto top coat ( Very fashionable ) NO hats or gloves, street shoes with rubber covers and a suit READY to fly 200 miles to a camp at -25C with a refuel enroute! Refused to fly them. The " big big execs " called the company ( with my help )the ops manager told them to go to a store ( thankfully available )and buy the needed clothes, boots ect. They did it with good grace and they learned the error at the refueling stop - just 30 minutes even in "full kit" was enough for them. They thanked me after the 4 days we spent together. Some folks just don't know.

You have to take care of folks like this.

I wouldn't survive 2 hrs on the Toronto stock exchange and they wouldn't survive 2 hrs in clothes like that.

 

Take it all with a grain of salt people...........Sharkie is a charter member of the Liars Club.

 

 

No really. He's a charter member of the Liars Club...........and proud of it.

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After the Pan Arctic Electra CFIT crash in 1975 near Rae Point, The oil companys started a clothing policy from the begining of September until May for anyone travelling north on their aircraft.

I was at Dome Petroleum in the 80s and our daily 737 from Calgary to Tuk was full of passengers wearing parkas, mukluks etc. The offshore pax added a Mustang Floater coat complete with beaver tail for the first few season when going out to the drillships. This was replaced by a full immersion suit in later years

Of course prior to all those rules I had been as far north as Ammond Ringes Island in September on the long way to Yellowknife from Calgary wearing jeans, workboots and a jacket. Learned my lesson really quick.

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My customers up here work outside and are dressed for the conditions. One guy I know was joking about his experience up north saying that he laughed at a joke once and almost froze his teeth -- I now know what he's talking about.

 

A funny note on what people don't know to wear is evident and a lesson can be learned from the locals -- I fly up from down south with the local Inuit on board. The first time I came up I couldn't figure out why they were all wearing their parkas, mukluks and hats for the entire trip...its obvious now.

 

The windchill hasn't come come warmer than -40 for 3 weeks-- it was -62 for a few days not long ago. Folks won't last 10 minutes without proper clothes.

 

I am wondering about the Cougar crash findings and how the response to the "arctic" issue from companies and government will affect arctic flying.

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My customers up here work outside and are dressed for the conditions. One guy I know was joking about his experience up north saying that he laughed at a joke once and almost froze his teeth -- I now know what he's talking about.

 

A funny note on what people don't know to wear is evident and a lesson can be learned from the locals -- I fly up from down south with the local Inuit on board. The first time I came up I couldn't figure out why they were all wearing their parkas, mukluks and hats for the entire trip...its obvious now.

 

The windchill hasn't come come warmer than -40 for 3 weeks-- it was -62 for a few days not long ago. Folks won't last 10 minutes without proper clothes.

 

I am wondering about the Cougar crash findings and how the response to the "arctic" issue from companies and government will affect arctic flying.

 

 

The response will be the same as it always has been. The chances are if you r waiting for search and recovery because of were the Military's Search and Rescue are located Unless a local company can get to you.

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The response will be the same as it always has been. The chances are if you r waiting for search and recovery because of were the Military's Search and Rescue are located Unless a local company can get to you.

 

I know the guys in SAR and I know they will do their best to help ASAP. It isn't their fault that their resources are mostly around the 49th parallel.

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I know the guys in SAR and I know they will do their best to help ASAP. It isn't their fault that their resources are mostly around the 49th parallel.

 

 

Please don't get me wrong. This is NOT directed at the guys that do the search and rescue. I am not sure i have the balls to jump out of anything that can fly, let alone in the tree's and dark. My hat is off to these people and it is a comfort knowing they are there and willing to do this to save my A$$. I just hope if it is ever me they get there in time. Not having at least 1 base north of 60 is not their fault.

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